Biological warfare

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  • #1
wolram
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  • #2
russ_watters
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I think it is both a mistake to try to stop science and naive to think it can be stopped.

Regarding that bit of science in particular, I'm excited by it.
 
  • #3
StatGuy2000
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I think it is both a mistake to try to stop science and naive to think it can be stopped.

Regarding that bit of science in particular, I'm excited by it.
I had the chance to read the article and the specifics of research at hand (using insects to spread genetically modified viruses to allow for rapid introduction of genetic modifications in crops) are certainly interesting and have the potential to improve crop yields.

That being said, I have several major concerns:

1. The potential for such genetically modified viruses to introduce genetic modifications outside of the intended crops (say, in neighbouring plants), and what effect this may have on the surrounding ecosystem.

2. The issues raised in the article, on how this particular scientific development could easily lead to new developments in biological weapons.

In either case, the issue shouldn't be about "stopping science" by which we mean stopping research. The questions should be who gets to direct the research and how (and who) gets to apply this research. And that is something that scientists, concerned citizens, and governments can and do have control over.
 
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BillTre
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The questions should be who gets to direct the research and how (and who) gets to apply this research. And that is something that scientists, concerned citizens, and governments can and do have control over.
This makes sense superficially, but is not realistic in the world we live in.
Both companies and various agencies in different countries can direct research either openly or surreptitiously to ends that that you might not approve of.
While company research may be regulated by countries in which they operate, there is little or no public oversight of military research and the like.
 
  • #5
256bits
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Seems like an interesting area of research just to see if it can be done.
If successful, any large scale application seems unwieldy with insects being the point man for application.
That would be a lot of insects farmed themselves and then ready at a beck and call just in case there is a drought, a wet season, ...
It would appear to be an expensive proposition for improving agricultural yields.
 

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