Biotech vs. Disease Bio major?

In summary, the individual is a senior deciding between a Biotechnology major at Indiana University and a Health and Disease Bio major at Purdue. They have been accepted to IU and just finished their application for PU. Both schools have a similar cost of around $20K for in-state students. The individual is leaning towards the Health and Disease Bio major due to their interest in the subject, but also recognizes the potential employability of a Biotechnology major. They are advised to compare the courses offered in each program and to not get too specific with their undergraduate degree, as this is a time to establish a foundation and explore options.
  • #1
Here's my situation:

Im a senior trying to decide between being a Biotechnology major at Indiana University, or a Health and Disease Bio major at Purdue. I will also be on a Pre-medicine track. For IU, I've already been accepted and I love the campus and environment, even if its not best for studying. For Purdue, I've just finished my application today but I think I am almost a lock for admission. I also love PU's campus and like its "smarter" environment.

I'm in-state for both, so costs are around $20K each. Which major (and school) do you guys recommend? Health and Disease Bio sound like exactly what I'm interested in, but Biotech seems like it would be more employable right out of college if I so chose. Thanks!
 
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  • #2
You might want to open up the course calendars and compare the courses with each stream. I strongly suspect you'll end up with a pretty similar course load either way, particularly in the first two years.

Other than that, I wouldn't try to get too specific with an undergrad degree. Sure "disease biology" sounds cool as a major, but really, what doors is that going to open that a biology degree will not? Conversely, will it close any? What happens if, for example, in your third year, you discover that you have a love for botany or perhaps animal physiology that you didn't know about and want to get into graduate school for? Getting specific is what you do in graduate school. Undergrad is about establishing a foundation in your chosen field and exploring the different options.
 

1. What is the difference between biotech and disease biology majors?

Biotech and disease biology are both branches of biology that focus on the study of living organisms. However, biotech majors focus on the application of technology and engineering to biological systems, while disease biology majors focus on the study of diseases and their causes.

2. Which major is better for a career in healthcare?

Both biotech and disease biology majors can lead to careers in healthcare. Biotech majors may focus more on developing new medical treatments and technologies, while disease biology majors may focus more on understanding and preventing diseases. The best option depends on your specific interests and career goals.

3. Can you switch from a biotech major to a disease biology major (or vice versa)?

It is possible to switch between biotech and disease biology majors, but it may require taking additional courses or completing extra requirements. This is because the two majors have different focuses and coursework. It is important to consult with an academic advisor before making the switch.

4. What kind of courses can I expect to take in a biotech or disease biology major?

In a biotech major, you can expect to take courses in biology, chemistry, technology, engineering, and possibly computer science. In a disease biology major, you can expect to take courses in biology, biochemistry, microbiology, and epidemiology. Both majors may also have lab components and opportunities for hands-on research.

5. What are the employment opportunities for graduates with a biotech or disease biology major?

Graduates with a biotech or disease biology major have a wide range of employment opportunities in industries such as pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, healthcare, and research. Some specific job titles may include biotechnologist, research scientist, medical technologist, or epidemiologist. Graduates may also pursue further education in graduate or professional programs.

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