Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Black holes and antimatter

  1. Apr 12, 2016 #1
    Black holes suggest anti-matter has negative matter but is this true?
    I think anti-matter has positive mass - e.g. a positron and electron annihilate giving off 0.5MeV + 0.5MeV photons where these photons have a huge positive energy. If the positron had negative mass then there would be no 1.0MeV of photon energy created.
    But when 'explaining' evaporating black holes (e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation#Overview)- matter [e.g. electron] and corresponding anti-matter [positron] are created out of 'the vacuum', If the electron is ejected, then the positron is absorbed in the black hole which loses mass. In this case the positron mass is negative.
    So does anti-matter have positive or negative mass-energy or both?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 12, 2016 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    They do not.
    That is the expectation of basically everyone.
    That is a problematic pop-science description, not the actual physics.
    If an electron escapes, there is no positron involved at all.
     
  4. Apr 13, 2016 #3
    A virtual positron is not the same thing as a positron. Hawking radiation comes from virtual particle pairs, of which only one of which becomes a real particle.
     
  5. Apr 13, 2016 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    It does not. If you check the actual calculations, there is no virtual particle pair involved.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Black holes and antimatter
  1. Antimatter Black Holes? (Replies: 17)

Loading...