Black Holes vs wormholes

In summary, the conversation discusses the effects of black holes and wormholes on time and the possibility of light escaping from them. It is mentioned that black holes have a strong gravitational field and nothing can escape them, but Hawking radiation suggests that light can escape from the event horizon. The concept of time is also discussed, with the understanding that time is relative and can be affected by the presence of a black hole. The difference between black holes and wormholes in terms of gravitational pull is also mentioned. The conversation ends with a clarification that there is no universal time in the universe.
  • #1

Radiatedtheory18

[SOLVED] Black Holes vs wormholes

when a planet has a black hole outside its orbit. and you were on the surface. would time slow down as the black hole gets closer? because the black hole is pulling everything towards it. i know nothing can escape a black hole, not even light. As we know wormholes are theorectical, we can predict the motion, speed and velocity by giving examples using laws of physics. do wormholes pull things towards it as like a black hole or is it totally different effect ( speaking theoreactlly)? any laws of physics showing the calculations of examples by how much time would slow down with the current data known of black holes would be much apprecated.
 
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  • #2
Where is the object you wish to measure time relative to - towards the hole, or away from it? The denser (or more attenuated) intervening spacetime becomes, the longer (or shorter) the interval of time elapsed. Light can, by quantum effect, escape the horizon of the black hole by a process called Hawking radiation. Wormholes, having progressively reduced curvature at first, do attract gravitationally with their cylindrical symmetry, but not as greatly as the spherically collapsed black hole.
 
  • #3
when an object is going towards it, time must slow down some way. i thought a black hole's gravtational field was so strong nothing could escape it? does hawking's radiation prove that light can escape from the event horizon?.
 
  • #4
Originally posted by Radiatedtheory18
when an object is going towards it, time must slow down some way. i thought a black hole's gravtational field was so strong nothing could escape it? does hawking's radiation prove that light can escape from the event horizon?.

Hawking radiation makes black holes glow slightly with photons, neutrinos, and other massive particles.

This is due to virtual particle pairs being created near the event horizon of the black hole. This happens everywhere as particle-antiparticle pairs, which upon creation annihilate each other; although, near the event horizon it is possible for one to fall in before annihilation and the other particle to escape, as Hawking radiation.

This does mean light escapes from the event horizon, part of it, although the hawking radiation never actually enters the event horizon. Hawking radiation also allows for black holes to lose mass, and possibly 'evaporate' (or decay).

Time slows down as the black hole approaches, or you approach the black hole, only relative to you, as viewed by an outside observer. You would notice no time change. If you entered the black hole and stayed for 10 years, and then exited the black hole, then you would have only aged 10 years, whereas everybody 'outside' of the black hole would have aged more then 10 years.

You seem to think there is a 'universal' time everywhere in the universe by which "TIME" is gauged, this is not so.
 
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What is the difference between a black hole and a wormhole?

A black hole is a region in space where the gravitational pull is so strong that nothing, including light, can escape from it. A wormhole, on the other hand, is a theoretical tunnel-like structure that connects two distant points in space-time.

Can anything survive entering a black hole or wormhole?

No, it is currently believed that anything that enters a black hole or wormhole would be destroyed by the extreme gravitational forces.

Are wormholes real or just science fiction?

Wormholes are currently a theoretical concept and have not been proven to exist in nature. However, they are allowed by Einstein's theory of general relativity.

Do black holes and wormholes have any practical applications?

While black holes and wormholes are fascinating objects to study, they currently do not have any known practical applications.

How are black holes and wormholes formed?

Black holes are formed from the collapse of a massive star, while wormholes are a hypothetical result of warping of space-time caused by extreme gravitational forces.

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