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Block and Strut - Equilibrium

  1. Jun 16, 2010 #1
    Block and Strut -- Equilibrium

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    The system shown to the right is in equilibrium. The steel block has a mass m1 = 217 kg and the uniform rigid aluminum strut has a mass m2 = 49 kg. The strut is hinged so that it can pivot freely about it's bottom end. The angle between the left wire and the ground is Θ = 34 degrees and the angle between the strut and the ground is φ = 49 degrees.

    a) What is the tension in the vertical wire that holds the steel block?
    T = 2128.77 N
    b) What is the tension in the left angled wire?

    c) What is the horizontal (x) component of the compressive force in the strut?

    d) What is the vertical (y) component of the compressive force in the strut?

    Here's the image: http://i48.tinypic.com/34g68f4.gif

    2. Relevant equations

    Torque = F x R
    F = ma

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I got part a but I'm stuck on part b through d. What should I do?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 17, 2010 #2

    kuruman

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Re: Block and Strut -- Equilibrium

    What you always do with problems of this sort:
    Step 1: Consider the strut as your system and draw a free body diagram.
    Step 2: Say that the sum of all the torques is zero.
    Step 3: Say that the sum of all the horizontal forces is zero.
    Step 4: Say that the sum of all the vertical forces is zero.

    This will give you three equations. Note that you have three unknowns. Solve the system of three equations for the unknowns.
     
  4. Jun 17, 2010 #3
    Re: Block and Strut -- Equilibrium

    Got it, thanks!
     
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