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Boeing's 787 flies today!

  1. Dec 15, 2009 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Finally!!! It is two years late.

    It is supposed to fly from Everett to Seattle right about now. This has a direct impact on my income so this is great news for me personally as well as everyone at Boeing.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 15, 2009 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    CNN is providing live coverage. It is taxiing right now.

    Funny [I hope] but I am actually nervous. Of course it would be terrible if there were signficant problems.
     
  4. Dec 15, 2009 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    There she gooooooes!!! woohoooo!!!
     
  5. Dec 15, 2009 #4
    Wow, it's big! And it is beautiful. Hope everything goes well on its maiden flight.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2009
  6. Dec 15, 2009 #5
    Direct impact for me as well. The 787 will keep us in projects for years to come.
     
  7. Dec 15, 2009 #6
    There is so much that can go wrong, and if nothing goes wrong, then somethings wrong...

    I've got knots in my stomach. I can only imagine how the guys at the runway feel.

    The test pilots are most relaxed people in the program. But they are crazy.
     
  8. Dec 15, 2009 #7
    These airport delays are getting out of hand. This flight was two years late.
     
  9. Dec 15, 2009 #8
    In this case better late than never. :)
     
  10. Dec 15, 2009 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    You, me, an army of suppliers and vendors, as well as the Boeing employees. In the otherwise bleak world of manufacturing, this a very good day.
     
  11. Dec 15, 2009 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    Slow too. Five hours to get to an airport forty miles away.
     
  12. Dec 16, 2009 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    This video from 2007 briefly discusses the financial and technical challenges of the 787. Today is considered to be historic for Boeing and the airline industry generally.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7PxH0-eT_0

    Takeoff

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fucq5BoEfEI
     
  13. Dec 16, 2009 #12
    Yeah!

    Observation: The chase plane wasn't exactly in the safest location, wingtip vortex-wise! Would have been tragic to get off the ground only to loose a wingtip...
     
  14. Dec 16, 2009 #13
    If it did I'd say Boeing got the curse of North American Aviation when they bought it up. Airship 2 of the XB-70 project was lost to a wingtip vortex accident.

    I wonder if it is the angles of the cameras but the wings of the 787 look like they are turned up fairly high
     
  15. Dec 16, 2009 #14
    Man, those wings sure were bending in that video!
     
  16. Dec 16, 2009 #15
    I noticed that too... must be a very comfy ride on the inside :smile:

    It's quite amazing to see how far we've come in my opinion...
     
  17. Dec 16, 2009 #16
    In structural testing, they pulled those wings up and together until they snapped, prematurely. That was one of the major delays. They had to do a massive modification. This was only a few months ago.
     
  18. Dec 16, 2009 #17
    My prediction is that the 787s are going to have a lottttt of problems with delamination of all that composite materials. Private jets are having those problems now. Get into the carbon-fiber repair business for airlines and you'll be a rich man.
     
  19. Dec 16, 2009 #18

    Borek

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    In the first video it is stated something like "plastic means no fatigue" - how true is it? I mean - I can easily believe material properties will change at different speed, but "no fatigue" sounds like an exaggeration.
     
  20. Dec 16, 2009 #19
    I'm sure they have test data for every composite component.

    Boeing puts every component through several life cycles in testing. Their standards are above the private jet manufacturers in my experience.

    I'm more concerned about it's ability to withstand lighting strikes. The composite cannot conduct around the airframe like the typical aluminum airframe. According to our senior electrical engineer the wire mesh "bus" system is the most sophisticated part of the aircraft. I'm curious as to how THAT was tested.
     
  21. Dec 16, 2009 #20
    I have not been following this airplane too closely, but apart from being composite, why is this thing special? How does its performance look like compared to a similar airplane?

    My guess is that its only 5-10% more efficient.....<YAWN>. Someone build that damn blended wing body airliner already! They all look like the same ole B-707 from 1960!

    bn707.jpg

    Johnson, they want a new airplane! "Ok boss, well take off two of the engines and rebrand it!"

    http://www.boeing.com/commercial/787/images/K63965-03_lg.jpg [Broken]

    In 50 years, this is all we can do?..........errr. The older one had stiffer wings. The 707 is a much prettier airplane IMO. Hell, it was the airplane that defined the "jet age."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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