Boiling Point Elevation

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  • Thread starter Biker
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Main Question or Discussion Point

So was thinking a little bit about the ideal gas law.
##P V = n R T##
And I read an article about the real gas law where they just edited few properties.
##(P + \frac{n^2 a}{v^2}) (V - nb) = n R T ##
Where a and b are constant determined experimentally.

So going back to our original point, Why doesn't the boiling point elevation have something related to the volume of the molecules or atoms?

And we know that the boiling point increases because of how the molecules prevent some of the liquid atoms to change into vapor state which reduces the vapor pressure in result increasing the boiling point.

So if we believe that this is what actually happen then bigger molecules/atoms will prevent more of the liquid atoms to change into vapor state which increases the boiling point.

What is happening here?

P.s I know that colligative properties only depend on how many solute particles.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
DrDu
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These effects exist but the boiling point increase is usually reported for infinite dilution where solutions behave ideally.
But for macromolecules, these effects become very important, cf. the Flory Huggins theory:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flory–Huggins_solution_theory
Oh that is actually great. Didn't know that there is a theory already there. Thank you!
 
  • #4
ProfuselyQuarky
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Not completely related, but ...
 

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