Boiling Point Q: Is Alcohol Higher Than Ammonia?

In summary, the conversation discusses the factors that contribute to the boiling point of different compounds. The presence of hydrogen bonding in certain compounds, such as ammonia and water, leads to a higher boiling point. The speaker correctly identifies that methanol, a polar molecule, also has a higher boiling point due to its dipole-dipole interactions. The CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics is mentioned as a resource for further information. The conversation also briefly touches on the topic of intermolecular bonding and the potential for nonpolar compounds to have lower boiling points.
  • #1
apchemstudent
220
0
I think the answer is e). I don't think it is ammonia because of the hydrogen bonding between nitrogen and hydrogen. This will result in a higher boiling point. This is the same with Hydrogen fluoride and water. However, the two organic molecules I'm not sure. I assume that since the alcohol is a polar molecule and thus have stronger dipole-dipole interactions thus, a higher boiling point. Am i correct? Thanks.
 

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  • #2
Methanol exists at RT as a liquid. You are correct the notion of hydrogen bonding increasing the bp (not only for the inorganics but for methanol as well). And if you have a CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, you will find that you are in fact correct.
 
  • #3
DrMark said:
Methanol exists at RT as a liquid. You are correct the notion of hydrogen bonding increasing the bp (not only for the inorganics but for methanol as well). And if you have a CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, you will find that you are in fact correct.

Thanks, I'm just wondering, what does CRC stand for?
 
  • #4
Not too sure if they've changed the definition, but originally CRC = Chemical Rubber Company:

http://www.hbcpnetbase.com/

A chemists constant companion back in the day.
 
  • #5
You can arrange the strength of intermolecular bonding-dipole dipole, hydrogen bonding, van der wall (low or high molecular weight), etc...

which one of the compounds has a low molecular weight, and would suspect to be nonpolar?

Note that it is asking for the lowest boiling point-lack of intermolecular attaction.



very nice
 

Related to Boiling Point Q: Is Alcohol Higher Than Ammonia?

1. What is the boiling point of alcohol?

The boiling point of alcohol can vary depending on the type of alcohol. Ethanol, the most common type of alcohol found in beverages, has a boiling point of 78.3 degrees Celsius or 173.9 degrees Fahrenheit.

2. What is the boiling point of ammonia?

The boiling point of ammonia is -33.34 degrees Celsius or -28.01 degrees Fahrenheit.

3. Which has a higher boiling point, alcohol or ammonia?

Ammonia has a higher boiling point than alcohol. This is because ammonia molecules have stronger intermolecular forces, such as hydrogen bonding, which require more energy to break apart and reach the boiling point.

4. Can alcohol and ammonia have the same boiling point?

No, alcohol and ammonia cannot have the same boiling point. As mentioned before, the boiling point is determined by the strength of intermolecular forces, and alcohol and ammonia have different molecular structures and properties.

5. Why are the boiling points of alcohol and ammonia important?

The boiling points of substances are important in various applications, such as in the distillation process for separating mixtures, in cooking and food preparation, and in the production of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Knowing the boiling points can also help in predicting the behavior of substances under different conditions.

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