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Book for introduction in aerodynamics

  1. Apr 2, 2005 #1
    Which book would you recommend for introduction to aerodynamics? One which is mathematically rigorous as well as comprehensive?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 2, 2005 #2

    Clausius2

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    Maybe Aerodynamics is a too wide field. I doubt there is only one book which treats it accurately in one volume only. Aerodynamics is a mix of several fluid mechanics theories. So that, the first thing you should do is to know very well Fluid Mech: you will be indirectly learning Aerodynamics.
     
  4. Apr 2, 2005 #3
    Could you then recommend me some good fluid mechanics books?

    And how is Fundamentals of Aerodynamics by John Anderson?
     
  5. Apr 3, 2005 #4

    enigma

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    Marvelous.

    IMO the best introductory text in aerodynamics.

    Depending on your current skill level, if that book is a little too math-heavy, I'd suggest you check out "Introduction to Flight" by the same author. It covers most of the basics of aerodynamics and also covers topics which delve into the actual design of aircraft (control surfaces, engine performance, maneuvers, etc.) and even a little bit into astrodynamics.

    I still reference both from time to time, although the Intro to Flight book mostly gets referenced for the standard atmosphere tables which are included in the appendix... a marvelous resource to have.

    And no, I'm not just saying all that because he taught my introduction to aerodynamics course...
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2005
  6. Apr 4, 2005 #5

    Clausius2

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    I have the CFD book of Anderson, and I was wondering if you had him as professor because I read he is /was at Maryland U. But now you have confirmed it.

    How is he?. Is he the typical strange man?. Is he a human being?. Or is he connected to some machine which provides him with additional neurons?. :biggrin:
     
  7. Apr 4, 2005 #6

    enigma

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    He's a Professor Emeritus here, and he's curator of aerodynamics at the Smithsonian (or some other similar prestigious title).

    In class he seems like a friendly grandfather. He's as concerned about your grade as you are, it seems. A great guy, and a wonderful professor.
     
  8. Apr 11, 2005 #7

    ken

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    Hi

    Model Aeroplane Aerodymanics by Martin Simmons.

    Very easy to understand and full of math based performance analasys.

    Ken
     
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