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Book for studying Bundles

  1. Aug 1, 2014 #1

    ChrisVer

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    I would like a good source from which I can study fiber bundles (mainly their application in Yang-Mills gauge theories, but also in differential geometry)... I tried to study them from the advanced differential geometry (note)book of 1 of my professors but it was a mess and it confused me even more.
    If you studied it from some book and you find it comprehensible, please let me know
     
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  3. Aug 1, 2014 #2

    Fredrik

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    Isham's book Differential Geometry for Physicists is a very good place to start, but it doesn't quite take you all the way there.
     
  4. Aug 1, 2014 #3

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Aug 1, 2014 #4

    Fredrik

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    I tried to study some stuff in Nakahara a long time ago, and I didn't like it. But it was a long time ago, probably before I had even studied differential geometry. So you probably shouldn't give that comment too much weight. (Edit: I mean my comment in the preceding sentence, not the other guy's comment in the preceding post).

    If I ever find the time to refresh my memory about the things in Isham, and then continue along that path, I think I will try Frankel, Fecko or Baez & Muniain, maybe all of them.

    Also, the books by John M. Lee are definitely the best place to study the basics of differential geometry.
     
  6. Aug 2, 2014 #5

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    Well, I recommended Nakahara not because of its mathematical rigor, but because of its applied nature to physics.

    There's also Nash's book.

    I myself prefer my math to be as rigorous as possible so I don't believe that I'll use these books.

    I mean from the table of contents you can be self assured that the coverage is short and to the point, I mean Homotopy and Homology in Nakahara's is discussed in less than 200 pages, and in Hatcher's it's like 400-500 pages. (It's my recollection from my memory which may be wrong).
     
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