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Book(s) to fill the gap from intro thermo to nonequilibrium thermodynamics/statistical mechanics

  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi, guys
I have posted this question on StackExchange, but no one seems to care answer. Because I don't think this is a simple textbook question, I start my thread here:

I know this is a big question. But as a graduate student, my research is somehow related to nonequilibrium thermodynamics/statistical mechanics. TBH, I hate how some research treat this subject like a mystery and use some theories carelessly. So I want to learn the subject at my own pace. I have finished Fermi Enrico's "thermodynamics" for a start. And I'm reading Terrell Hill's "introduction to statistical thermodynamics." Although I am pretty satisfied with the content of these two books, I have no idea where should I go from here.

Because I expect my future research will still be based on nonequilibrium thermo/stat mech, I need a booklist to guide me from "knowing something" to "knowing something advanced." In the meantime, I hope I can equip myself with advanced mathematics by going through the booklist. Can anyone provide some ideas on this?

To be more precise, my research interests include the particle diffusion in crystal materials and phase transition. And I also expect to do some research in the future about the transport of heat and charged species in the liquid or solid phase.

P.S., I am not looking for working understanding of this subject. A solid but accessible booklist would be perfect.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #3
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e posted this question on StackExchange, but no one seems to care answer. Because I don't think this is a simple textbook question, I start my thread here:
Have a look at this course on Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics (syllabus here). Is it too trivial?
Thanks for your reply. This is not a trivial syllabus. But I am not sure if I can handle this after I finish the reading of Terrell Hill's book.
 
  • #4
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Thanks for your reply. This is not a trivial syllabus. But I am not sure if I can handle this after I finish the reading of Terrell Hill's book.
In the syllabus page, there is a section "References" with a number of books mentioned. Check them out, especially #1 and #6. The first one is written by the professor who has conducted the course. Maybe you'll get some help from the books.

When you feel you can handle the course, do attend it. Prof. Balakrishnan is a very good professor and his courses are gems.

Other than that, other members with more outlook than me will surely help you out. :smile:
 
  • #5
Andy Resnick
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Because I expect my future research will still be based on nonequilibrium thermo/stat mech, I need a booklist to guide me from "knowing something" to "knowing something advanced." In the meantime, I hope I can equip myself with advanced mathematics by going through the booklist. Can anyone provide some ideas on this?

To be more precise, my research interests include the particle diffusion in crystal materials and phase transition. And I also expect to do some research in the future about the transport of heat and charged species in the liquid or solid phase.

P.S., I am not looking for working understanding of this subject. A solid but accessible booklist would be perfect.
Here's a few suggestions:

Principles of condensed matter physics (Chaikin and Lubensky)
Macrotransport Processes (Brenner and Edwards)
Statistical Dynamics, Matter out of Equilibrium (Balescu)
 
  • #6
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Here's a few suggestions:

Principles of condensed matter physics (Chaikin and Lubensky)
Macrotransport Processes (Brenner and Edwards)
Statistical Dynamics, Matter out of Equilibrium (Balescu)
Balescu's book covers the topics I really want to know and learn. Could you please give a general idea of this book in terms of depth and mathematical rigor?
 
  • #7
Andy Resnick
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Balescu's book covers the topics I really want to know and learn. Could you please give a general idea of this book in terms of depth and mathematical rigor?
It's not a trivial book- but I can't really answer the question without knowing your 'comfort level'. It's definitely graduate level reading and there are no problems/exercises to work out.
 
  • #8
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It's not a trivial book- but I can't really answer the question without knowing your 'comfort level'. It's definitely graduate level reading and there are no problems/exercises to work out.
Got it. Thanks!
 
  • #9
vanhees71
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The volumes on thermodynamics and statistics by Landau and Lifshitz are very good books. Vol. V treats thermostatics and Vol. X kinetic theory (including the Schwinger-Keldysh real-time formalism of quantum many-body QFT, applied to the non-relativistic case). Vol. IX is about equlibrium quantum-many-body theory (nonrelativstic).
 

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