Book suggestions

  • Thread starter Gallin
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  • #1
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I was wondering if anyone could suggest any good books about physics. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.


Perhaps add a brief summury of the book.
 

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  • #2
berkeman
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I was wondering if anyone could suggest any good books about physics. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.


Perhaps add a brief summury of the book.
Welcome to the PF.

Hopefully you can see that your question is extremely broad, and not practical to answer in its current form.

What level of physics? Popular, intro, college undergrad level, graduate level?

What area of physics?

If you could please tell us more about your background, and what you are hoping to learn in the near term, that would help a lot in our replies. Also, this thread may get moved to the Learning Materials or Academic Guidance forum at some point.
 
  • #3
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Well currently I'm in high school taking physics and it seems rather boring. So I decided to read some stuff on my own and what I have read so far is a lot more interesting. So that's why I've come asking for some suggestions. So I would say that I am looking for some intermediate stuff. Any area really ,I just like reading.


So far I've read
In Search of Schrodinger's Cat by John Gribbin
And The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene

So anything in the same spirit as those.
 
  • #4
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How about some real physics books like The Feynman Lectures rather than poetry books.
 
  • #5
chiro
Science Advisor
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Well currently I'm in high school taking physics and it seems rather boring. So I decided to read some stuff on my own and what I have read so far is a lot more interesting. So that's why I've come asking for some suggestions. So I would say that I am looking for some intermediate stuff. Any area really ,I just like reading.


So far I've read
In Search of Schrodinger's Cat by John Gribbin
And The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene

So anything in the same spirit as those.
Apart from Daverz excellent suggestion, if you have the motivation and interest Roger Penrose The Road To Reality - The Complete Guide To The Laws of The Universe.
 
  • #6
Hawking's "A brief history of time"
 
  • #7
836
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Another book by Feynman: The Character of Physical Law, which is less technical than the Feynman Lectures, far shorter, and much cheaper.

Or if you know a bit of calculus you can start with a freshman level book like Halliday and Resnick's Physics.
 
  • #8
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Thanks for the suggestions. Would I be able to get these at a book store like barns and noble?
 
  • #9
Thanks for the suggestions. Would I be able to get these at a book store like barns and noble?
Yes of course. Another book you should definately have in mind, is Quantum Electrodynamics (or QED) by Richard Feynman.
 
  • #10
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So of the given suggestions if I was to pick one, which would should I choose? For now.
 
  • #11
Gallin, I myself am in high-school physics and purchased many physics books. Richard Feynam has a wonder full way with explanation and assuming you move slowly and take notes his books are excellent teachers. Id recommended "The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. 1: Mainly Mechanics, Radiation, and Heat " or the complete and definitive addition ( depending on your level of interest and amount of money ). I should also note theres a new edition of the defetinve edition coming out this month.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0805390464/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20

In the first chapter he discusses , in a way , blowing soup and the reason why it cools. The reasoning extend beyond the fact that your breath ( hopefully ) is cooler then the hot soup. It was a wonderful way to introduce atoms and how they interact.

I wouldn't recommend "Roger Penrose The Road To Reality - The Complete Guide To The Laws of The Universe" because I have opened it up and immediately saw a huge amount of mathematical information. I refuse to read it because reviews on amazon said the author shouldn't teach math and wont open it up until i finish reading my current math book. It on the other hand received excellent reviews and can't wait to read it.

If your a more visual person then I can think of none other then julius sumner miller to excite your interest.

Video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwkUNrSCNMg&feature=related

List of all his 20 minute " lectures" : http://wit.itmonline.com/Series/science_demonstrations.htm

Find the corresponding video relative to your class's focus at the time.
 
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  • #12
Nabeshin
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I wouldn't recommend "Roger Penrose The Road To Reality - The Complete Guide To The Laws of The Universe" because I have opened it up and immediately saw a huge amount of mathematical information.
I would also recommend against Penrose's Road to Reality. The book seems to be written, as best I can discern, for a 45 year old person with no formal education in physics or mathematics, who, upon losing his job, finds himself with abundant free time and an insatiable desire to learn the laws of nature.
 
  • #14
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I did a mistake sorry..
Those 5 parts are from only 1 part of the lecture

There are 7 part of the lectures in total, each around 1 hour length
 

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