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Bose-Einstein Condensates

  1. Jul 27, 2006 #1

    Pythagorean

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    Is the new rock star physics, where do I sign up?

    Seriously though, what kind of background does working with Bose-Einstein condensates require?

    I'm taking the 2 standard 300 levels: mechanics and e&m, and math421: applied analysis this semester for physics degree classes.

    Here are some of the optional courses that I think might be relevent based on what I've learned from these forums (and the web in general). (solid state, optics, and modern are all required):

    Phys 614: Ice Physics
    Phys 522: Statistical Mechanics
    Phys 631: Electromagnetic Theory
    Phys 651: Quantum Physics
    Phys 660: Radiative Transfer


    Things I don't think apply (but I've been wrong before:)

    A handful of 600 plasma classes (basic, advanced, and methods of numerical simulation in fluids)

    Phys 638 Digital Time Series Analysis
    Phys 639 InSAR and its applications (this has got to be irrelevent)
    Phys 640 Auroral Physics
    Phys 645 Fund of Geophys Fluid Dynamics (right...)
    Phys 650 Aeronomy (just in case I'm wrong!)
    Phys 672 Magnetosphere Physics
    Phys 673 Space Physics
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 27, 2006 #2

    Pythagorean

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    Heh, I guess I shouild note that we don't have a condensate program here, so if anyone knows of any National Condensate authorities or general methods for getting a new department started, I'd be interested in even the farthest fetched of ideas.

    I forgot to ask, additionally, if there is any point in even trying to study BE Condensates at my current academic level, and if there is, where's the free online resources? Hook a junker up! :tongue2:
     
  4. Jul 27, 2006 #3

    eep

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    What do the different hundred-level classes mean?
     
  5. Jul 27, 2006 #4

    Pythagorean

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    I think the general trend is 100 level is for freshman's and nonmajors (like I'd take a 100 level anthropology class as a core requirement for a baccelors degree, but an anthropology major could probably start at a 200 level class. I started with a 200 level physics class. Generally they're the same, except the 200 has calculus.

    I think the system is designed around a 6-year Master's Degree:

    100 - Freshman
    200 - Sophomore
    300 - Junior
    400 - Senior

    500, 600 - Grad
     
  6. Jul 27, 2006 #5

    eep

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    I'd say quantum physics and stat. mech apply to bose-einstein condensates, but I'm just an undergrad myself
     
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