Box sliding up an inclined plane with constant velocity

In summary, the problem being discussed is about an object moving up an inclined plane at a steady speed of 3.2 m/s. The question is what force, parallel to the plane, needs to be applied to overcome the component of gravity along the incline. The object's mass and the angle of the inclined plane are known. The solution involves setting up an equation with the force and the weight of the object, and solving for the unknown force. The person asking for help is frustrated and seeking assistance.
  • #1
Laurent
1
0
I've been working on this problem all afternoon and i just have a complete blackout and no idea how to solve it:
the question is what force, parallel to the plane has to be applied if the object is moving up an inclined speed at a steady speed of 3.2 m/s.
i have the object's mass and the angle of the inclined plane...
if anyone can relieve me...that would be amazing...i'm so frustrated...

thank you...
 
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  • #2
Laurent said:
I've been working on this problem all afternoon and i just have a complete blackout and no idea how to solve it:
the question is what force, parallel to the plane has to be applied if the object is moving up an inclined speed at a steady speed of 3.2 m/s.
i have the object's mass and the angle of the inclined plane...
if anyone can relieve me...that would be amazing...i'm so frustrated...

thank you...

Well the force that you will need to overcome is the component of gravity along the incline. Suppose the x-axis is along the incline, pointing upwards. the clue is that you have a constant speed : this means that the block is moving with zero acceleration. thus, you have along the incline :

[tex]0 = F -mgsin(\theta)[/tex]

F is the force you are looking for...

regards
marlon
 
  • #3


I understand your frustration, solving physics problems can be challenging and overwhelming at times. Let's break down the problem and see if we can figure out a solution together.

First, we need to identify the forces acting on the box as it slides up the inclined plane. These forces include the force of gravity pulling the box down, the normal force of the plane pushing the box up, and the force parallel to the plane that is being applied to move the box up the plane.

Next, we need to use Newton's second law, which states that the sum of all forces acting on an object equals its mass times its acceleration. In this case, since the box is moving at a constant velocity, we know that its acceleration is zero. Therefore, the sum of all forces acting on the box must also be zero.

Since we are looking for the force parallel to the plane, let's focus on that component. We know that the force of gravity acting on the box is equal to its mass times the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2). The normal force of the plane is equal and opposite to the force of gravity, so it can be expressed as -mg, where m is the mass of the box.

Now, let's look at the force parallel to the plane. Since the box is moving at a constant velocity, we know that the force applied must be equal and opposite to the force of friction acting on the box. This can be expressed as -μmg, where μ is the coefficient of friction between the box and the plane.

Putting all of this together, we can set up the equation: -mg - μmg = 0. Solving for the force parallel to the plane, we get F = μmg = μ(mg). Now, all we need to do is plug in the values for the mass and the angle of the inclined plane to solve for the force.

I hope this helps and relieves some of your frustration. Remember, when solving physics problems, it's important to identify all the forces at play and use the appropriate equations to find the solution. Good luck!
 

Related to Box sliding up an inclined plane with constant velocity

1. What is the force required to keep a box sliding up an inclined plane with constant velocity?

The force required to keep a box sliding up an inclined plane with constant velocity is equal to the force of gravity pulling the box down the incline. This force is known as the weight of the box and is given by the formula W = mg, where m is the mass of the box and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

2. Does the angle of the inclined plane affect the velocity of the box?

Yes, the angle of the inclined plane does affect the velocity of the box. The steeper the angle, the greater the force of gravity pulling the box down the incline and the faster the box will accelerate. However, as long as the box is moving at a constant velocity, the angle of the incline will not affect the velocity.

3. How does friction play a role in the motion of the box on an inclined plane?

Friction plays a significant role in the motion of a box on an inclined plane. Without friction, the box would slide down the incline at an increasing rate due to the force of gravity. However, friction acts in the opposite direction, slowing down the box and allowing it to move at a constant velocity.

4. What happens if the force of friction is greater than the force of gravity on the box?

If the force of friction is greater than the force of gravity on the box, the box will not be able to move up the inclined plane. The force of friction acts in the opposite direction of the motion, so if it is stronger than the force of gravity pulling the box down, the box will not be able to overcome it and will remain stationary.

5. Can the constant velocity of the box on an inclined plane be maintained indefinitely?

In theory, yes, the constant velocity of the box on an inclined plane can be maintained indefinitely as long as the forces acting on the box remain balanced. However, in real-world scenarios, factors such as air resistance and imperfections in the surface of the inclined plane may cause the velocity to change over time.

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