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Box structure tracing experment

  1. Dec 4, 2015 #1
    I want to do an experiment where I follow the particle in all trajectory until it hits the wall of the box, then I want to draw out this box's structure based on the particle collision. One thing would be that the particle does not need to go in all trajectory, but I would like to know how to make the particle go in all trajectory and how to follow the path for each of these particles. That would probably be another question. Thanks for the help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 4, 2015 #2
    How about using a flashlight and a camera?
    Upon striking a wall, many of the photos will scatter - some towards the camera. The structure of the box can be inferred from the direction from which the photons reach the camera and the relative intensity of the light from each direction.
    Or, if you don't want to use a camera, there is actually a simpler and superior method. View the scattered photons directly with your eyes. The stereoscopic data collection will allow a more detailed analysis of the box structure.
     
  4. Dec 4, 2015 #3
    I think it would be easier doing this with electron, photon is too hard to keep track. When it hit the boundary of the box I want to keep track of the time it takes and the length it moved from the box center. I would be good if I can track the electron's speed too.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2015
  5. Dec 4, 2015 #4

    Nugatory

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    What do you know about the technology used to track electrons and photons?

    What you are describing is done routinely every day with photons - it's called "radar".
     
  6. Dec 4, 2015 #5
    Right but it is hard to track individual position of photon in comparison to electron. If you can recommend me a technology used to track the electron's position and speed it would be cool.
     
  7. Dec 4, 2015 #6

    DrClaude

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  8. Dec 4, 2015 #7
    That looks really cool, how about having the electron move at various trajectory? Would that cause a change in momentum?
     
  9. Dec 4, 2015 #8

    DrClaude

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    If you observe it, the path of the electron will be unique. If you don't observe it, it will be unknown. But a single electron will never be seen as taking more than one path, even from the quantum mechanical point of view (QM will say nothing about which path an electron actually took, but that all possible paths contributed to the probability distribution of where you will find the electron).
     
  10. Dec 4, 2015 #9
    But this probability distribution will sketch out my box :D
     
  11. Dec 4, 2015 #10

    DrClaude

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    Not with a single particle, if you want to follow its trajectory.
     
  12. Dec 4, 2015 #11
    Well I'm looking for electron path where it converges at the center like a * shape, but if the electron path is going in a straight line it doesn't really trace out the spherical shape of a sphere, so if the electron can move at a curved or random trajectory it would be cool, then I plot all paths at a particular distance with the amount of time it takes.
     
  13. Dec 4, 2015 #12
    Of course, if you insist on electrons, you will some pretty high-energy electrons or you will need to put that box in a vacuum. That cloud chamber is actually tracking heavier particles.
    I don't see how a curved trajectory works for you, but a magnet can cause the electron path to bend.
    Does the particle need to be a subatomic particle? Would a colloidal dispersion do? Or perhaps a superball? I really don't have a sense of what your limits are.
    superball-2.jpg
     
  14. Dec 4, 2015 #13
    It will be speculation from here so I'll leave it as it is for now, thanks for the candy, or marble lol
     
  15. Dec 4, 2015 #14
    Those are super balls. The original black ones were made of vulcanized polybutadiene. They bounce like crazy, so if you throw them into a box and track their motion (for example, with a camera), every bounce will tell you where there is a surface.
     
  16. Dec 4, 2015 #15
    Well hmm, I am thinking to sketch out the structure of space time, in which a minimum or maximum value can be visualized. So if an electron is traveling along the space time structure it should experience a maximum value. But of course this does not account for the speed of the particle and the relativistic aspect of the question so it would be a speculation on my part. By doing so it might be possible to find the curvature in space time or it might be that the structure is too small to be visualized. This is done by NASA. I'm assuming a non cartesian structure.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2015
  17. Dec 5, 2015 #16
    Nevermind, assume a cartesian structure, if it is not it would be speculation.
     
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