Boyles Law to Calculate Lung Volumes

In summary, there are several methods for measuring lung volumes, including spirometry, gas dilution, and imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRI scans. Each method has its own advantages and limitations, and it is important to choose the most appropriate method for the specific situation and patient.
  • #1
simondon
1
0
Hi All,
This is a bit long, so only read on if you have too much time on your hands...
Clinically its important to know how large someones lungs are. Asking them to breathe out as much as they can, will not tell us the lung volume, as there is always a residual volume of gas left in the lungs.
One method of measuring Lung Volumes is to ask the patient to sit in a sealed perspex cabin (a body plethysmograph). It uses Boyles law to calculate the lung volume.

At the end of a breath out, the mouth/lungs are occluded: we have a fixed amount of gas and calculate its volume.

p1V1= p2V2

The patient tries to breathe in and out, there is no flow as their mouth is occluded.
Changes in lung pressure are meaured in the mouth
Changes in lung volume are meaured as a volume discplacement in the cabin (or rather the proportional pressure change).

As the patient tries to breathe in against the occluded mouthpiece, we see decreasing pressure in the lungs p1, and increasing lung volume V1
As the patient tried to breathe out against the occluded mouthpiece, we see increasing lung pressure p2 and decreasing lung loume V2.
We can now calculate the volume in the lungs when p=1atm

I hope that makes sense...
My question is, can you think of another way of measuring lung volumes without a perspex cabin, eg by applying a pressure, changing the volume etc? (there are other ways using gas dilutiuon, but I wanted a more mechanical process). If I use a syringe to push a few mls of air into the patients mouth/lungs, the pressure change will not reflect this volume as the patient will react/relax, I do not know what the patient is doing, they may push or pull, the pressure will not refelct the volume change...
Thanks in advance
Simon
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


Hello Simon,
Thank you for your question. There are indeed other methods for measuring lung volumes without using a body plethysmograph. One common method is called spirometry, which measures the amount of air a person can exhale in one second (FEV1) and the total amount of air they can exhale (FVC). This can give an estimate of lung volumes and can also be used to diagnose respiratory conditions such as asthma or COPD. Another method is called gas dilution, where a gas with a known concentration is inhaled and then exhaled, and the change in concentration is used to calculate lung volumes. This method is often used in conjunction with spirometry for more accurate measurements. Additionally, there are imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRI scans that can also be used to measure lung volumes. Each method has its own advantages and limitations, so it is important to determine which method is most appropriate for the specific situation and patient. I hope this helps!
 

Related to Boyles Law to Calculate Lung Volumes

What is Boyle's Law?

Boyle's Law is a gas law that describes the inverse relationship between the pressure and volume of a gas at a constant temperature. It states that as the pressure on a gas increases, the volume of the gas decreases and vice versa.

How is Boyle's Law used to calculate lung volumes?

Boyle's Law can be used to calculate lung volumes by measuring the pressure and volume of air in the lungs. The pressure in the lungs can be changed by altering the position of the diaphragm and rib muscles. By measuring the changes in pressure and volume, lung volumes can be calculated.

What are the units of measurement for pressure and volume in Boyle's Law?

Pressure is usually measured in units of atmospheres (atm) or millimeters of mercury (mmHg), while volume is measured in liters (L) or milliliters (mL). However, any consistent units can be used as long as they are converted properly.

What are some practical applications of Boyle's Law in medicine?

Boyle's Law has several practical applications in medicine, including the use of mechanical ventilators to assist patients with breathing, the calculation of lung volumes to diagnose respiratory diseases, and the understanding of the mechanics of gas exchange in the lungs.

Are there any limitations to using Boyle's Law to calculate lung volumes?

Yes, there are some limitations to using Boyle's Law to calculate lung volumes. This law assumes that the temperature and amount of gas in the lungs remain constant, which may not always be the case. In addition, lung volumes can also be affected by factors such as lung compliance and airway resistance.

Similar threads

Replies
2
Views
966
  • General Engineering
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Classical Physics
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Thermodynamics
Replies
8
Views
922
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
3K
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Classical Physics
Replies
14
Views
1K
Back
Top