BPA and plastic bottles

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  • Thread starter Norman
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882
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello all,

As the father of an infant son and an avid user of plastic bottles, the news from Canada and the US concerning the safety of certain plastic containers for children (and adults) made me investigate what types of bottles are safe.

A quote from the Today Show:
"The bottles with the numbers 3, 6 and 7 are not safe for use across the board," said Dr. Leo Trasande of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
Is that statement accurate? His credentials seem adequate to make him more knowledgeable of medicine than myself (I am merely a physicist), but this makes me wonder. I have been unable to find any independent evidence (ie. not coming from a plasitics company) to deny this claim or to support it.

So, has anyone looked into this closely? I have only done a cursory internet search and I didn't find anything that was satisfactory. Does anyone have more authoritative information or really any information? Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Ryan
 

Answers and Replies

1,120
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I have been following the different reports/studies about this for the past 20 years. It has gone back and fourth for a long time now. I would tend to agree with Dr.Trasande, more so with the use of items for a small or infant child.
 
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I use Nalgene bottles all the time for sports. This is kinda worrisome.
 
mgb_phys
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The chemical aint too good for you - but the evidence that it can leach out of the plastic into water in significan (or even measurable) quantities is a bit limited.
The replacment are aluminium bottles - Al is knon to cause dementia!

It's a bit difficult to do large scale studies comparing the health of people who have used Nalgene sports bottles during years of exercise with people who have sat on the couch drinking out of soda cans!
 
chemisttree
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The chemical aint too good for you - but the evidence that it can leach out of the plastic into water in significan (or even measurable) quantities is a bit limited.
The replacment are aluminium bottles - Al is knon to cause dementia!

It's a bit difficult to do large scale studies comparing the health of people who have used Nalgene sports bottles during years of exercise with people who have sat on the couch drinking out of soda cans!
Be http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=99"
 
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mgb_phys
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But using the standard medical technique of extrapolating down from a massive dose -
http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/319/7213/0/b

( In the 80s a truck driver dumped 20t on Aluminium into the wrong tank at a water treatment works in the UK - resulting in an entire village with more than the usual number of village idiots.)
 
Moonbear
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( In the 80s a truck driver dumped 20t on Aluminium into the wrong tank at a water treatment works in the UK - resulting in an entire village with more than the usual number of village idiots.)
I think I can state with absolute certainty that if you have 20 t of aluminum dropped on you, it will be lethal.

This debate on BPAs has been around a long time. My understanding is that the only conditions where the BPAs leech out in any biologically relevant amounts (at least enough to mess up cell cultures in petri dishes) are if you microwave the plastics. People have been told for a long time not to microwave baby bottles. Then again, if people would just listen to medical advice and breast feed their babies, they wouldn't have to worry at all about the plastics that bottles are made out of.
 
DaveC426913
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The replacment are aluminium bottles - Al is knon to cause dementia!
My knowledge may be years out of date, but...

Association does not imply causation. AFAIK, Alzheimer's is associated with Al but not NOT caused by it.
 
DaveC426913
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Hello all,

As the father of an infant son and an avid user of plastic bottles, the news from Canada and the US concerning the safety of certain plastic containers for children (and adults) made me investigate what types of bottles are safe.

A quote from the Today Show:


Is that statement accurate? His credentials seem adequate to make him more knowledgeable of medicine than myself (I am merely a physicist), but this makes me wonder. I have been unable to find any independent evidence (ie. not coming from a plasitics company) to deny this claim or to support it.

So, has anyone looked into this closely? I have only done a cursory internet search and I didn't find anything that was satisfactory. Does anyone have more authoritative information or really any information? Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Ryan
My wife is a high risk labour and delivery coach. She has been researching BPA extensively for the better part of a year. She has attained the title of http://healthyenvironmentforkids.ca/english/news/index.shtml?x=3429" for her efforts.

She is convinced it is true, essentially as the show claims, right down to the numbers on the bottles. We are steadily replacing all our plastics in our house with glass. She's even got me checking the bottoms of containers at the grocery store!

The recent news showing that this is finally coming to the fore is hugely vindicating for her.

She would probably be happy to answer your questions.

Another thing she would be happy to do is point you at the http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/chemicals/bisphenol/bisphenol.html". The executive summary is that there is, indeed, "some concern" ("some concern" being a well-defined term on a scale).
 
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882
2
Dave (and everyone :smile: )-

Thanks for all the information. We are erring on the side of caution for both our son and ourselves, though my wife breast feeds so we are not too terribly worried. But he will be switched to animal milk soon, so we are a little concerned about any containers we might use in the coming future.

My wife did find this very nice "cheat sheet" for bottles and sippy cups (which we are more concerned about currently) that do not contain BPA. The list can be found here: http://safemama.com/2007/11/22/bpa-free-bottle-and-sippy-cup-cheat-sheet/

Thanks,
Ryan
 

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