Brekdown vacuum

  1. May 8, 2014 #1
    Good day.

    What happens if a vacuum to put two electrodes, 1 cm apart, and electrical voltage in 1e9?

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 8, 2014 #2

    UltrafastPED

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Then your electric field strength is 1e9/1e-2 = 1e11 V/m. You probably cannot sustain this field strength without heroic efforts.

    I have done a lot of work about 1e7 V/m ... if increased much beyond that my electron source arcs. This is not much better than dry air, even though it is in an ultrahigh vacuum (10^-9 torr).

    This paper discusses many of the issues (1978):
    http://cartan.e-moka.net/content/download/409/2311/file/ptv.pdf

    But perhaps you mean "will it break the vacuum"? Such as this laser system may one day attempt:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...-laser-to-tear-apart-the-vacuum-of-space.html
     
  4. May 9, 2014 #3
    All right.

    But it may happen that the vacuum breaks.
    And the gap will be trips charged particles?
     
  5. May 9, 2014 #4

    UltrafastPED

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Say again, please?
     
  6. May 9, 2014 #5
    I don't understand.
     
  7. May 9, 2014 #6

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    What you wrote here makes no sense. It is difficult to figure what you are asking:

    English may not be your first language. However, this means that you need to write down a bit more explanation for the rest of us to understand what you are saying. So far, in your first three posts here, you have written quite a bit LESS than the one single post UltrafastPED made in Msg. #2.

    Zz.
     
  8. May 9, 2014 #7
    Fain.

    One can break through vacuum, and what conditions must be fulfilled in doing?
     
  9. May 9, 2014 #8

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    What?

    Please note that while it is often referred to as "vacuum breakdown", we are not really causing something similar to a dielectric breakdown in vacuum. From what we know now, the mechanism still requires the presence of residual gasses in the "vacuum".

    Read this thread:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=744778

    Zz.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted
Similar Discussions: Brekdown vacuum
  1. In a vacuum (Replies: 3)

  2. Vacuum - Vacuum Pump (Replies: 1)

  3. Vacuum Comsol (Replies: 1)

Loading...