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Brightest Explosion Ever Observed

  1. Feb 19, 2005 #1

    Astronuc

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    Scientists have detected a flash of light from across the Galaxy so powerful that it bounced off the Moon and lit up the Earth's upper atmosphere. This "giant flare" was the brightest explosion ever detected from beyond the Solar System. For over a tenth of a second the remarkable flare was actually brighter than a full moon.

    The neutron star that erupted is SGR 1806-20, about 50,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 19, 2005 #2

    Janitor

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    I noticed last night on CNN that the news anchor called it a "neuron" star. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Feb 19, 2005 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Would this event have been visible to naked-eye observers?
     
  5. Feb 19, 2005 #4
  6. Feb 19, 2005 #5

    marcus

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    Dearly Missed

  7. Feb 19, 2005 #6

    turbo

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  8. Feb 26, 2005 #7
    Brightest gamma ray burst within milky way

    Let's hope there isnt a invisible magnetic neutron star circling a nearby star within 10 l/y.... otherwise could be in big trouble:

    http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0502/19grb/

    Is there anything to rule out an unseen neutron star drifting the dark within say 10 - 20 l/y from the sun?
     
  9. Mar 1, 2005 #8

    SpaceTiger

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    Absolutely. At this point, we can see everything within 10-20 light years that's more massive than a planet...and even some of those are now detectable. Besides, the article says it:

    "Fortunately, there are no magnetars anywhere near the earth."
     
  10. Mar 2, 2005 #9
    What about stars that may go supernova within, says 1000 years from now? This if I recal can be dangerous on a very lage distance too no ? Have we ever looked at that possibility seriously ?
     
  11. Mar 2, 2005 #10

    SpaceTiger

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    Yeah, though I wouldn't worry about it too much. I think this may be the most serious candidate for such an explosion:

    Betelgeuse

    I haven't seen precise calculations as to the impact of such an event, but it would likely be little more than a nuisance (frying instruments, maybe increasing cancer rates, etc.). If there were a gamma-ray burst in our galaxy (and pointed at us), there might be a little more cause for concern. These events are extremely rare, however.
     
  12. Mar 2, 2005 #11

    a neuron star would be a rather more historic and universe changing discovery! :rofl:
     
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