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Broad band

  1. Feb 18, 2004 #1

    wolram

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    i have just connect my BB its maximum download is 512k
    not the best, but an amazing difference to the old system,
    now i have BB is there a way to optimise its uses?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 18, 2004 #2

    dduardo

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  4. Apr 8, 2004 #3
    Also use any download accelerators. Some servers will only give you a set amount of bandwidth when downloading, etc. So download accelerators log you into the servers multiple times to get that limited amount but *x # of connections.
     
  5. Apr 18, 2004 #4
    Usually, trying to optimise your BB's bandwidth is useless. Unless of course if you want to fasten your download speed, you could try what MythioS suggested. If your BB is 512kbps, it is most likely to be capped (by your ISP).
     
  6. Apr 18, 2004 #5

    Evo

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    Wolram, is it DSL? DSL speed is usually priced by the maximum amount of bandwidth an ISP will agree to deliver for that connection. Did your ISP offer different speeds? If you think 512k is significantly lower than what they sold you, call them and ask them to have the line tested, in some cases the LEC can improve the line quality if you complain enough. The technician should have told you what the maximum bandwidth your connection could sustain at the time they did the loop test.

    A problem with DSL is that attenuation on the line will reduce the speed. The longer the distance of the local loop, the greater the attenuation. Even with a very short loop, poor quality (numerous splices, damaged sheathing, etc..) will also decrease the bandwidth.

    If it's cable, it's a shared environment and heavy subscriber ratio's in your area will reduce the amount of bandwidth available.
     
  7. Apr 18, 2004 #6

    wolram

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    i live in a rural area and our local exchange has just been converted,
    i think download rate is in the ball park on a good day, but as you say
    EVO it can slow down due to usage, the only thing that bugs me
    now is that often i have reboot to get a connection, tiscali help
    informs me that it is a common problem with ADSL.
     
  8. Apr 18, 2004 #7

    Nereid

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    wolfram's "Location" says "warwickshire", which is in the UK. This means, in terms of Evo's informative post, that the "LEC" (local exchange carrier) is almost certainly BT (formerly British Telecom) as almost all "local exchange" competitors have been driven out of business.

    tiscali, IIRC, is an ISP; the underlying ADSL infrastructure is BT's. In theory, wolfram has a contract with tiscali, which *should* specify the 'line speed', sometimes expressed in terms of threshholds (e.g. '512KB available 99%, as measured by xxx'); you can be sure that tiscali has such a contract with BT!

    However, if BT's contracts are anything to go by, they are carefully constructed by very smart legal staff to explicitly avoid making any commitment whatsoever to the 'consumer' customer, and any failure to deliver against the *perceptions* created by the marketing dept is (from BT's POV) totally irrelevant. wolfram's only recourse is a complaint to tiscali, then Oftel.

    tiscali's help is probably telling wolfram what the marketing dept told them to say; the underlying cause of the failures is likely both tiscali (or the vendor of the equipment - more likely the software - which sold to tiscali) and BT. wolfram likely has a 'manta ray' ADSL modem attached to his PC, manufactured by Alcatel. This is most unlikely to be the cause of the need to reboot. If the local (BT) exchange ("central office" in US-speak) has only recently been converted to ADSL (this is a very significant engineering effort, IIRC), there will likely be a period of up to a year before all the wrinkles are ironed out.
     
  9. Apr 18, 2004 #8

    Evo

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    Wow Neried, also very telecomm savvy!!! :biggrin:

    I remember in the olden days of yore when I would try to get an international private line installed, having to deal with Mercury there in the UK and waiting 6-12 months for them to get their end done.
     
  10. Apr 18, 2004 #9

    Nereid

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    Sadly Mercury - now Cable&Wireless, IIRC - has all but exited the UK consumer market (global IP networks, for megacorporations, is another story); no more local "Dr Who" telephone booths (except BT ones, and Kingston ones, if you live in Hull).

    The behaviour of telcos is almost as much a red cape to this cow as racist **** from the likes of {fill in your favourite Social Sciences poster here}.
     
  11. Apr 18, 2004 #10

    Evo

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    Cable & Wireless has pretty much pulled out of the US market.

    The cannibalization within the telecomm industry over the past few years has whittled the top players down to a small handfull again.

    I've worked most of my life for AT&T, designing corporate global data & IP networks and have seen so much change over the past few decades. I remember designing data networks back in 1985 and we only had 4 digital hubs in the entire US, capable of 9600 baud & that was as good as it got. I would have to design the circuit as analog until I could get to one of the digital hubs.

    Nereid, you amaze me by your broad knowledge of topics!!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2004
  12. Apr 19, 2004 #11

    wolram

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    1985? looks can be deceptive, the modem i have is a SAGEM, the
    stories i could tell about getting a "good", line, after months of
    complaining, and having a separate line exclusively for my PC on
    BTs recommendation, i had five engineers call on three consecutive
    days, each to do different test, how many can there be? well
    at least i had my monies worth that week, so i have a perfect
    line, but as NEREID said a new exchange may take a while to
    settle in.
     
  13. Apr 19, 2004 #12

    Evo

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    Born in 1955, and yes, it's a recent photo. I'm wondering if the ISP is providing sufficient bandwidth. If it is a rural area, they may have only leased a tiny amount of bandwidth to make it more profitable. At least you're getting a decent speed.

    I can't even get DSL where I live, it is much too rural to be profitable.
     
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