Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Brushing teeth?

  1. May 29, 2005 #1
    Why do we need to Brush our teeth when animals, who eat anything from raw meat to live vegetables don't get any of their teeth sore or rotten?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 29, 2005 #2

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    They certainly do.

    What makes you think every wild animal dies by tooth and claw?
     
  4. May 29, 2005 #3

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    They do.Not cavities,because of the lack of sugar in their food.They do have a similar type of bacterial flora in their mouth as do humans.They don't have white teeth,unless they're really young.

    It's tough thing being an animal...

    Daniel.
     
  5. May 31, 2005 #4

    Phobos

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    (1) Some animals replace teeth quickly (e.g., sharks with multiple rows of teeth or rodents with ever-growing teeth)
    (2) Some animals DO clean their teeth, with help (e.g., birds (plovers) cleaning Nile crocodiles' teeth)
    (3) Many animals don't live long enough for tooth decay to be a concern.
    (4) Low sugar diets (high suger = high bacterial activity)
     
  6. May 31, 2005 #5

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Do sharks get cavities? :smile:
     
  7. May 31, 2005 #6

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Actually, this is worth a second look. The things humans are dying of nowadays are things that they never would have dealt with when the average life expectancy was <30 years.

    What we are really dying of is old age, it's just that one some given part gives out before the others. Something has to give out first.
     
  8. May 31, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    It seems for most animals, gum (periodontal) disease is a bigger concern than cavities (caries). Nonetheless, they can get cavities if there is too much sugar in their diet.

    Just one example of a veterinary dentist.
    http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/pbhc/sumvet.htm
     
  9. May 31, 2005 #8
    And that marine animals won't have decayed teeth since the water will keep their teeth strong and better, especially those in the oceans. Their teeth are not the same as humans' also, I think there is no 'nerve' inside. (--i don't know the correct term for human teet's internal "nerve"--)
     
  10. May 31, 2005 #9

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Before processed foods, sugary drinks, etc... humans weren't too proned to cavities. I'm often amazed by how cavity free teeth from ancient humans are. Last night I was watching a new show about King Tut, 19 years old when he died and no cavities. He did have an impacted wisdom tooth though. One of the main problems with teeth in ancient times was wear from the stone particles in their stone ground flour for bread, which was a staple.
     
  11. May 31, 2005 #10
    Would the antibacterial properties of saliva in some animals such as dogs reduce tooth and gum disease? Is sugar the only cause of tooth decay?
     
  12. Jun 1, 2005 #11
    No, sugar is not only one but acid exist in ones' mouth can cause it too. Like nitrate, cloride etc in daily food/fruits we eat.

    Eating T-bone stek or anything with bones, anything hard, stiff....., poeple be careful or teeth scatched. From small scrathc it becomes big scratch and germs enter to make teeth bad.

    After eating meals, one should brush teeth, careful, drink asmall cup of listerine or Ora2 to kill germs sticky with teeth.
    In the street, never open your mouth too large if yawning and when talking with someone standing too close, watch out his mouth or germs from his can fly to yours.

    Any pet you have at home like puppy, you can or better brush her/teeth often too so that when it kisses your face, your face skin still keep its cleaness. I know people with thick face skin never care about this.

    :approve:
     
  13. Jun 1, 2005 #12
    I've been brushing my dogs teeth, she does not seem to mind. My old dog had really bad gums, and lost a lot of teeth in the last few years of its life.

    Before the time of antibiotics, it was not uncommon to die from a abscessed tooth.
     
  14. Jun 1, 2005 #13

    Phobos

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Couldn't resist Googling that one! The answer seems to be 'no' (especially since they loose & replace teeth so quickly), but here's a fun tidbit from a dentist's website for kids...

     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Brushing teeth?
  1. Fill holes in teeth? (Replies: 17)

  2. Hardness of teeth/bone (Replies: 1)

  3. Brushing teeth! (Replies: 1)

Loading...