Bubbling air through acetone

In summary, the problem asks for the creation of bubbles of gas in a liquid using elevated pressure. The problem also defines what exceeded pressure is, and how it is related to the atmospheric pressure. Finally, the pressure inside a bubble needs to be greater than the manometric pressure in order for the bubble to form and grow.
  • #1
Mark Gerts
4
0
Homework Statement
I guess the way but I'm blind to the solution
Relevant Equations
All I see here are the equlations of absolute and extended pressure (P abs = P atm + P ext), so the temperature, liquid height and 2 different pressures need seem odd, but they must be used
Can you, please, help me with this exercise? I know the formulas for the required parameters, but I know neither how to use them here nor in what way to solve the exercise. Plus I don't understand what for I was given the temperature
Thank you for your help and advice
 

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  • #2
Mark Gerts said:
Homework Statement:: I guess the way but I'm blind to the solution
Relevant Equations:: All I see here are the equlations of absolute and extended pressure (P abs = P atm + P ext), so the temperature, liquid height and 2 different pressures need seem odd, but they must be used

Can you, please, help me with this exercise? I know the formulas for the required parameters, but I know neither how to use them here nor in what way to solve the exercise. Plus I don't understand what for I was given the temperature
Thank you for your help and advice
What is the exact word-for-word statement of the problem?
 
  • #3
Chestermiller said:
What is the exact word-for-word statement of the problem?
What absolute and exceeded pressure should be created in the air pipe to create gas bubbles in the liquid?
 
  • #4
Mark Gerts said:
What absolute and exceeded pressure should be created in the air pipe to create gas bubbles in the liquid?
What is the definition of exceeded pressure? I have never heard the term before.
 
  • #5
Chestermiller said:
What is the definition of exceeded pressure? I have never heard the term before.
I'm sorry, maybe my translation wasn't correct. That's the pressure of the substance on the environment or vessel excluding the atmospheric pressure
 
  • #7
Lnewqban said:
I believe the temperature is given, so you can calculate the density of the liquid inside the tank and the pressure it produces at the point the hose discharges.
Please, see:
https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/...cific-weight-temperature-pressure-d_2038.html
I see, but why do I need acetone's pressure if I'm given the pressure inside the tank? And how to use this information to find out the necessary absolute pressure of the air?
 
  • #8
By extended pressure, I think that means the gauge pressure.

If ##p_{atm}## is the atmospheric pressure at the upper surface of the acetone, ##\rho## is the density of the acetone, and h is the depth at which the bubbles form, what is the absolute pressure p at depth h?

This being the case, what does the pressure inside a forming bubble have to be in order for the bubble to form and grow?

What does that tell you about the pressure in the air hose releasing the bubble?
 
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Likes Lnewqban
  • #9
Mark Gerts said:
I see, but why do I need acetone's pressure if I'm given the pressure inside the tank? And how to use this information to find out the necessary absolute pressure of the air?
You only know the manometric pressure above the surface of the liquid, which has been given as ##P_{m2}##.
That pressure is not the same for all the points inside the tank, as it happens to a diver in the ocean, as you dive deeper into the liquid, your ears feel increased static pressure.

Please, see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrostatics#Hydrostatic_pressure

Note that the value of manometric pressure is always respect to absolute atmospheric pressure.
A manometer that is not connected to anything will indicare zero, even when it is under the effect of the absolute atmospheric pressure.

:cool:
 

What is the purpose of bubbling air through acetone?

The purpose of bubbling air through acetone is to increase the rate of evaporation of the acetone. This can be helpful in certain experiments or processes where a faster evaporation rate is desired.

How does bubbling air through acetone affect its properties?

Bubbling air through acetone can decrease its density and increase its vapor pressure. It can also lead to the formation of bubbles, which can change the surface tension of the acetone.

What is the recommended method for bubbling air through acetone?

The recommended method is to use a bubbling apparatus, such as a glass tube or pipette, to introduce small bubbles of air into the acetone. This can be done by using a gas source, such as a compressed air tank or a pump.

What precautions should be taken when bubbling air through acetone?

It is important to use caution when handling acetone, as it is a flammable and volatile substance. Make sure to use proper ventilation and avoid any sources of ignition. It is also recommended to wear protective equipment, such as gloves and goggles, when working with acetone.

Are there any alternative methods to bubbling air through acetone?

Yes, there are alternative methods such as using a vortex mixer or stirring the acetone with a magnetic stir bar. However, these methods may not be as effective in increasing the rate of evaporation as bubbling air through acetone.

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