Bubbling Chlorine through a mix of Ferrocyanide/Ferricyanide/Bromide

  • Thread starter Athiril
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In summary, bubbling chlorine gas through a solution of potassium ferrocyanide is a production method of potassium ferricyanide, but it can also produce hydrochloric acid and potentially toxic gases depending on the pH and the presence of other salts in the solution.
  • #1
Athiril
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Hi,

So I've been reading bubbling chlorine gas through a solution of potassium ferrocyanide is a production method of potassium ferricyanide. But I wanted to ask if there were other reactions that occur, ie: does the chlorine gas react with dissolved potassium ferricyanide? Or dissolved chlorine gas create a reaction with ferricyanide (such as to release HCN gas).

I have a solution of potassium ferricyanide and potassium bromide, other times it'll be sodium chloride instead of KBr. I use this for bleaching, in turn it gets reduced.

It would be practical and cheaper to oxidise it back to potassium ferricyanide for more (but not indefinite), than to keep buying more (~$40+/kg here). I've already done similar things such as passing SO2 gas through a solution.


So rather than a straight solution of potassium ferrocyanide, it would be a mix of potassium ferricyanide, a chloride or bromide salt as well.


So I wanted to know if there were any other reactions that would take place that would leavy possibly undesirable products in my solution.
 
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  • #2
The chlorine gas reacts with the potassium ferrocyanide to produce potassium ferricyanide and hydrochloric acid. The hydrochloric acid may react with the chloride or bromide salts, but the reaction would be dependent on the pH of the solution. If the pH is low, then the chloride or bromide salts will react with the hydrochloric acid producing chlorine gas, bromine gas, or hydrogen chloride gas, which can be toxic in high concentrations. However, if the pH is higher, then the reaction should not occur. Additionally, the chlorine gas may react with the dissolved potassium ferricyanide to form potassium chlorate, but this reaction is highly unlikely due to the low solubility of potassium chlorate in water.
 

Related to Bubbling Chlorine through a mix of Ferrocyanide/Ferricyanide/Bromide

1. What is the purpose of bubbling chlorine through a mix of Ferrocyanide/Ferricyanide/Bromide?

The purpose of bubbling chlorine through this mix is to oxidize the ferrocyanide and ferricyanide ions, as well as bromide ions, to produce a more reactive and stable form of cyanogen bromide. This compound is commonly used in organic synthesis and as a reagent in analytical chemistry.

2. How does bubbling chlorine affect the mix of Ferrocyanide/Ferricyanide/Bromide?

Bubbling chlorine through the mix will cause the ferrocyanide and ferricyanide ions to undergo oxidation, resulting in the formation of cyanogen bromide. The bromide ions will also be oxidized to form bromine, which can then react with the cyanogen bromide to produce a more reactive compound for use in chemical reactions.

3. Is it safe to handle a mixture of Ferrocyanide/Ferricyanide/Bromide?

While the individual components of this mixture may not be toxic, the resulting compound of cyanogen bromide is highly reactive and potentially hazardous. Care should be taken when handling this mixture, and proper safety precautions should be followed.

4. What are some common uses for the compound produced by bubbling chlorine through a mix of Ferrocyanide/Ferricyanide/Bromide?

The compound produced, cyanogen bromide, has various uses in organic synthesis, including as a reagent for the formation of amides and nitriles. It is also used in analytical chemistry for the determination of trace amounts of substances, such as cyanide and thiocyanate ions.

5. Can the process of bubbling chlorine through this mix be reversed?

No, the process of bubbling chlorine through this mix is not reversible. Once the oxidation has occurred, the resulting compound of cyanogen bromide cannot be easily converted back into its original components. It would require additional chemical reactions and processes to reverse the effects of the chlorine bubbling.

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