Buddhism: Question of Consciousness Reincarnation

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In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of reincarnation in Buddhism and the question of how consciousness began its cycle of reincarnation. The idea of a true beginning is challenged, as both Buddhism and Christianity struggle with the concept of existence without a beginning. The conversation also touches on the idea of doublethink and the religious nature of reincarnation. Overall, the conversation highlights the complexity of understanding the beginning of consciousness and existence.
  • #1
Anubis
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the buddhism teaches us that our consciousness are reincarnated whenever we pass away. However, just like the problem posed by athiests to christians about the notation of a beginning, I too, have the same question. Suppose that buddhists are right and that reincarnation is the way to go, how did our consciousness went into rotation in the first place?
 
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  • #2
By conservation of angular momentum.
 
  • #3
There is no such thing as a true begining. In Judaism/christianity God creates everything in the begininning, but then this wasn't really the beginning, because god already existed and it seems impossible for there to be a beginning. This is similar to the buddhism problem. The reason that this problem exists is because Man always sees things as having a beginning and an end. It is hard for us to understand that existence cannot have a beginning. It's not an irrational idea though. The circle doesn't have a beginning or an end.
 
  • #4
arildno said:
By conservation of angular momentum.
Very Zen, arildno. :smile: :cool:
 
  • #5
From a spiritual point of view, it really doesn't matter. But believing such things, especially if you work in science or math, in my opinion, takes a degree of "Doublethink".
 
  • #6
Reincarnation is a religious doctrine, not a philosophical concept. As such, it doesn't have to make sense.
 
  • #7
Is that any harder to believe than a universe emerges from nothing, or one that bangs and collapses in eternal cycles?
 
  • #8
Please see our policy on religious discussions. This is a question that is best left for buddhism in particular, rather than philosophy in general.
 

Related to Buddhism: Question of Consciousness Reincarnation

1. What is the concept of consciousness in Buddhism?

In Buddhism, consciousness refers to the awareness or subjective experience of an individual. It is the knowing and perceiving aspect of the mind that is constantly changing and affected by external stimuli. Consciousness is seen as a fundamental aspect of the human experience and is believed to continue on after death through the process of reincarnation.

2. How does Buddhism view reincarnation?

Buddhism teaches that after death, a person's consciousness will be reborn into a new form. This cycle of rebirth, known as samsara, is determined by the individual's karma, or the consequences of their actions in this life and previous lives. Reincarnation is seen as an opportunity for spiritual growth and the ultimate goal is to break free from the cycle and achieve enlightenment.

3. Can consciousness be transferred to another being in Buddhism?

In Buddhism, consciousness is not seen as a fixed entity that can be transferred from one being to another. Rather, it is believed to be constantly changing and dependent on various factors. However, some Buddhist teachings do mention the possibility of a highly advanced being being able to transfer their consciousness to another being through their spiritual abilities.

4. How does Buddhism explain the relationship between consciousness and the physical body?

In Buddhism, the body and mind are seen as interconnected but separate entities. The body is seen as impermanent and subject to decay, while the mind or consciousness is seen as a stream of ever-changing experiences that continues on after death. The body is seen as a vessel for the mind, but not the source of consciousness itself.

5. Can consciousness exist without a physical form in Buddhism?

In Buddhism, consciousness is not tied to a physical form and is believed to continue on after death. This is because consciousness is seen as a non-physical aspect of the mind that can transcend the limitations of the physical body. In meditation and other spiritual practices, Buddhists aim to detach from the physical body and tap into the pure consciousness within.

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