Building WW2 airplanes

  • Thread starter Pengwuino
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  • #26
Danger
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Evo said:
As yes the 'Salamander', no, the lizard reference was something else. :tongue2:
Yes, I remember it well. That is, after all, why I got that nice warm doggie suit out of storage. :wink:
 
  • #27
FredGarvin
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Pengwuino said:
You can own an F-18 Fred. Heck you can own an apache helicopter :D There was a show on i think the history channel or the military channel with people who owned all sortsa crazy stuff.

No you absolutely can not own a piece of hardware like that if it is in the current military active inventory. Go ahead and ask Boeing or MD if you can buy one. Even if you were Bill Gates they'd tell you no. All sorts of crazy stuff does not include high end items that our forces use. If you have ever been a part of ANY government procurment process you would know. Do you think they are rolling off an assembly line and sitting in a lot with for sale signs on them? No. The government puts orders in years a head of time and the production runs match those requirements. Every single tool, nut bolt, etc...belongs to the US government on those projects. You can't even go to Arizona to the graveyards and buy an F-4 that has been retired for years. They government will not allow it.

You can get surplus items all day long but they have to go through the red tape and be "released" from government control.
 
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  • #28
FredGarvin
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Pengwuino said:
Where do they get the aircraft for movies?? I know now they do a lot of computer addition... but i know Pearl Harbor had real plane chase scenes in real aircraft... Bet those kinds of places would know whre to get one or get oen built :D

They are either privately owned or they use RC models.

Pengwuino said:
And dang, i heard theres a lot of even early jet aircraft that you can buy from less then a million.
You can possibly buy one for that. That does not take into account the amount of money to get jet rated to be able to even fly the thing, then there is the matter of getting it flying and keeping it flying. The time between inspections and overhauls for a WWII era plane will be a lot longer than a jet engine aircraft. Also, you'd want to consider getting your A&P so you could do some of the work yourself and not have to pay to have someone do everything.
 
  • #29
Astronuc
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Evo said:
No mention of Heinkel?
Heinkel and Dornier made great targets for the RAF. :biggrin:
Evo said:
He required me to learn about all WWII planes, . . . .
Required? Sorry, but he sounds like a nut.
Evo said:
although I built models of WWII planes as a child, . . . .
Way cool. :cool:
 
  • #30
Astronuc
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Re: Spitfires
Danger said:
I think that there are only 2 flying ones left. Robertson's is one, and the other is in Europe somewhere. That buddy of mine who flew Robertson's, by the way, swears up and down that he broke Mach in one of those suckers during a power dive in the Battle of Britain. I didn't think that the airframe would handle the transsonic shock, or that the service ceiling would give enough acceleration room. I'd love to hear from an aeronautical engineer (hint, hint) about that. He was there and I wasn't, but it still sounds a little hinkey.
According to http://www.warbirdalley.com/spit.htm, there are still ~50 Spitfires in air-worthy condition. I don't know the status of all though.

I built a model P-47 and the literature that came with it indicated that it was the first propeller aircraft to break the sound barrier - in a power dive. It was probably the only one with a sufficiently strong frame to do that. The literature also said that a P-47 flew through a brick wall with the implication that the pilot walked away and the fuselage was intact. I don't think a Spitfire was strong enough to withstand the forces.

Danger said:
Do you happen to know what happened to the P-38's they were trying to get out of the ice in Scandanavia a few years back?

I don't know about the Lightning's in Scandanavia This article - http://www.warbirdalley.com/p38.htm - indicates only 7 airworthy. The article shows Joltin Josie, which I think is the one I saw at an airshow many moons ago.
 
  • #31
FredGarvin
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The P-38 was restored and flown. There was a show on the discovery channel about the first flight.

http://p38assn.org/glacier-girl-continued.htm

A fantastic resource for this area is the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum. Granted, they do slant towards the RCAF and the RAF, but their collection is astounding. They have the only flying Lancaster as far as I know. They also have a Spitfire.

http://www.warplane.com/pages/aircraft.html
 
  • #32
Danger
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FredGarvin said:
You can get surplus items all day long but they have to go through the red tape and be "released" from government control.
Okay, I don't know what the procedure was, but that buddy who drove the Spit had a friend outside of the club who owned and flew an F-4C PII.
You aren't taking into account the international arms dealers either. In South America and most of Africa, you can buy anything that you can afford including Tornados, Jaguars, F-16's, SAM 7's... you name it. Bringing them home might not be that easy. Vampire jets were a dime a dozen in Argentina a couple of decades back, and F-5's (one of my favourites) are popular everywhere.

FredGarvin said:
They are either privately owned or they use RC models.
Also, some are redressed common planes. A family a few miles from here owns 5 Harvards that they rent out. Any full-scale Japanese Zero that you see in a movie is one of those. They're very hard to tell from the real thing.

Astronuc said:
Sorry, but he sounds like a nut.
Well... he did marry Evo... :tongue:



I shouldn't scoff, though. I'm trying very hard to be her next ex-husband. :biggrin:

Astronuc said:
Re: Spitfires

According to http://www.warbirdalley.com/spit.htm, there are still ~50 Spitfires in air-worthy condition. I don't know the status of all though.
Maybe it was 2 in North America... I'm easily confused.

Astronuc said:
It was probably the only one with a sufficiently strong frame to do that.
Believe it or not, the Ju-52—which has to be the butt-ugliest thing ever designed with wings on it—had no airframe redline. It had nowhere near the power needed for Mach-busting, but still... :bugeye:

Astronuc said:
The literature also said that a P-47 flew through a brick wall with the implication that the pilot walked away and the fuselage was intact.
That doesn't speak too highly of the pilot; most try to avoid that. :surprised

Astronuc said:
I don't think a Spitfire was strong enough to withstand the forces.
Wouldn't need to. British pilots fly through air.

FredGarvin said:
A fantastic resource for this area is the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum.
There's a very nice museum in Hangar 10 at Calgary International as well.

Thanks both for the links. I don't have time to check them now, but I definitely will later.
 
  • #33
FredGarvin
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Danger said:
Okay, I don't know what the procedure was, but that buddy who drove the Spit had a friend outside of the club who owned and flew an F-4C PII.
You aren't taking into account the international arms dealers either. In South America and most of Africa, you can buy anything that you can afford including Tornados, Jaguars, F-16's, SAM 7's... you name it. Bringing them home might not be that easy. Vampire jets were a dime a dozen in Argentina a couple of decades back, and F-5's (one of my favourites) are popular everywhere.
No one can vouch for foreign countries. However, in the case of the aircraft mentioned before, there are not that many countries that operate them. There's a vampire sitting on the ramp right across from our manufacturing plant. It was bought from the Swedes.

Danger said:
Also, some are redressed common planes. A family a few miles from here owns 5 Harvards that they rent out. Any full-scale Japanese Zero that you see in a movie is one of those. They're very hard to tell from the real thing.
Now you're really showing your Canadian side! Those are AT-6's for us yanks.
 

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