Burning salt water for fuel?

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  • #76
baywax
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Interesting conjecture. But I suspect that given Gerty owned a fair number of Paul Cezannes' works, it wouldn't have been too hard for her to appreciate and see the paring down technique that Paul had introduced into his latter paintings.

From that perspective, it is not beyond the realm of possibility that Picasso having been invited on numerous occasions to dine with Gerty and Leo, may have found this a topic of discussion.

Sadly, the timelines are a little woolly, so who knows who ultimately influence who.

Cheers

Aquafire

Ultimately it was the invention of the telegraph, telephone and related communications devices. These innovations (at the turn of the 20th century) rendered the whole world accessable to people and the boundaries of time differnences began to fall. One of the art historian put it like this: when you could talk to Paris at 4pm from Maine and it was 2am in France this was so astounding to the intellects of the time that the idea of simultaneous events (regardless of distance) began to emerge. Thus, the cubists did their best to portray the simultaneity of all events in their work. The results were varied but you may have heard of Marcel Du Champs' "Nude Descending The Staircase", a cubist work, and the criticisms that came from the American camps calling it "an explosion in a shingle factory".
 
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  • #77
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The results were varied but you may have heard of Marcel Du Champs' "Nude Descending The Staircase", a cubist work, and the criticisms that came from the American camps calling it "an explosion in a shingle factory".
And from other cubists for various reasons. It explodes in Phila, a few miles from me.
 
  • #78
baywax
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And from other cubists for various reasons. It explodes in Phila, a few miles from me.

I hadn't thought about other cubists bashing other cubists... typical...

sort of like high frequency radio waves bashing salt water... tumultuous.
 
  • #79
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----warning---- Amateur post. Probably not worth reading. -----warning-----

How about a long tubing filled with water. The inside of the tubing would be made of a material to reflect radiowaves so that they continue passing through the water. Make the tubing long enough so that the radiowaves eventually become "spent". Would this be efficient? Or at least more efficient than electrolysis?
 
  • #80
Chi Meson
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You are proposing a resonant tube. Such a tube would select a single specific wavelength of the microwaves that are produced. It would not be necessary anyway, since water is very good at absorbing microwaves in the first place
 
  • #81
Hootenanny
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Welcome to the club Chi, have you been shown the secret handshake yet?
 
  • #82
Chi Meson
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I was in gold before, a while back, then my "contribution" ran out. The only reason I didn't re-contribute was due to an irrational mistrust of Paypal. I think the handshake has changed, though...I'm getting funny looks.
 

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