1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Cable tension problem

  1. Nov 12, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Two cables are attached to a 16.00 kg mass, or 160 N (Our teacher told us to use 10 for gravity). The angle between the cable on the left and the ceiling is 48 degrees. The angle between the cable on the right and the ceiling is 22 degrees. Calculate the tension in the cable on the left if the system is at rest. Calculate the tension in the cable on the right if the system is at rest.

    I have been absent from class, so I can't really attempt at a solution. Any help would be appreciated.


    2. Relevant equations
    T1cos(∅)1=T2cos(∅)2

    T1/T2=cos(∅)2/cos(∅)1

    3. The attempt at a solution
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 12, 2012 #2

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    1. You should draw your sketch more to scale to help with the geometry and trig.
    2. The mass is given in kg, so you should calculate its weight in Newtons, not pounds.
    3. Please show an attempt based on what you know about equilibrium and Newton's laws.
     
  4. Nov 12, 2012 #3
    It's sort of hard to make a drawing to scale; i just drew that picture because it was a given and I thought it would help. I have already converted to newtons.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2012 #4

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Ok, then please show an attempt at a solution and someone will check your work and provide assistance if necessary.
     
  6. Nov 12, 2012 #5
    Sorry, I put it in the post now, but I haven't been to class and I'm lost on how to do this type of problem. I've been watching videos on it, but I can't find anything similar to this problem in that the cables connect to two parts of the mass rather than just one point
     
  7. Nov 12, 2012 #6
    So far you have two unknowns and one equation. Do you know how that one was derived, from sum of forces? Now you need another equation. I'd recommend one that descrbies the tension in an individual cable. Or you could just do some simple trig to find the tensions.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  8. Nov 12, 2012 #7

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    For all intent and purpose, you can assume the mass is attached at one point, rather than splitting the weight between 2 points . As has been noted, you already have one equation in the horizontal direction, now you need to look in the vertical direction to get the other.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Cable tension problem
  1. Cable Tension problem (Replies: 5)

  2. Cable tension problem (Replies: 7)

Loading...