Calculate how much surface area/volume of water

  • Thread starter tgn
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  • #1
tgn
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does anyone have a formula or a good link to show how to calculate how much surface area/volume of water it takes to push (from the bottom) a column of water of a certain width to a certain height. i'm trying to make my own sump out of acrylic and i need to know this to get the dimension right so that i'd know exactly how much of the first chamber will be submersed in water and how much wil be dry. thanks,
:confused:
 

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  • #2
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Well have you tried using the concept of hydrostatic equilibrium? Try writing an equation relating the atmospheric pressure with the height of the water column.

Cheers
mav
 
  • #3
tgn
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maverick280857 said:
Well have you tried using the concept of hydrostatic equilibrium? Try writing an equation relating the atmospheric pressure with the height of the water column.

Cheers
mav
heheh yeah i was hoping someone would tell me what the formula or relationship is though, as i'm not a physics major, do recall doing this kind problem in general physics though.
 
  • #4
russ_watters
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It sounds like you have a common misconception about pressure: pressure doesn't get concentrated. If you take a container of any size, fill it with water and attach a hose to the bottom, the water in the hose will rise no higher than the level of the water in the tank.
 
  • #5
tgn
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russ_watters said:
It sounds like you have a common misconception about pressure: pressure doesn't get concentrated. If you take a container of any size, fill it with water and attach a hose to the bottom, the water in the hose will rise no higher than the level of the water in the tank.
oh... i guess i'm wroing, i've always thought with the larger surface area on 1 side and a small surface area on the other, water on the smaller side will rise to a higher level due to pressure downward on the other side with the larger surface area..
thanks for the correction
 
  • #6
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russ_watters said:
It sounds like you have a common misconception about pressure: pressure doesn't get concentrated. If you take a container of any size, fill it with water and attach a hose to the bottom, the water in the hose will rise no higher than the level of the water in the tank.
Well looking sleepily at the diagram, I though this was a problem involving pressure. Did you get it to work tgn?

cheers
 

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