Calculate spring rate in 3 bump scenarios?

In summary, a higher spring rate will result in a stiffer ride, but it is still important to choose a spring rate that provides a comfortable ride.
  • #1
olechampion
1
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Hi, Working on my vehicle and have a theoretical question I'd like a 2nd opinion on. The physics question is how much influence the force of a bump has in conjunction with a perfectly tuned spring rate can have on ride quality (as crudely defined in vertical acceleration z force m/s squared). I.e. how important is spring rate in ride quality? To look at this problem I have outlined three bump scenarios each with different heights.

The objective is to keep vertical acceleration constant at .5 m/s squared

Solving For: Spring Rate

Three scenarios:
bump height: 0.25 inch
bump height: 1 inch
bump height: 2 inchIn all scenarios the bump width is the entire road (ie like going onto a new road or bridge)Constants
vertical acceleration m/s squared: .5

vehicle speed: 60 mph
Tire Stiffness:
Tire Diameter: 32.2 inches
Tire Overall Width: 9.3 inches
Tire Loaded Radius: 15.2 inches
Coefficient of Rolling Resistance: 0.012 (10.00 -20 BIAS)
Coefficient of Rolling Resistance: 0.008 (10.00 -20 RADIAL)
Cornering Coefficient (deg -1): 0.1370
Camber stiffness: 40 lb / deg
Vertical stiffness: 4935 lb / in
Rolling Circumference: 89.33071 in

Front Axle Weight: 6900 pounds
Rear Axle Weight: 13500 pounds

Suspension Travel: 4 inches
Length of shock extended: 18 inches
Length of shock compressed: 14 inches

Wheelbase: 241 inches
Dual Tires rear axle

Side question, any decent suspension calculators to estimate problems like this? Would be great to do a sensitivity analysis.
 
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  • #2
Answer:The spring rate is directly related to the ride quality, so it is very important. In general, a higher spring rate will result in a stiffer ride, so you would want to choose a spring rate that provides a comfortable ride while still providing adequate support for bumps.In order to calculate the spring rate for the three scenarios, we need to first calculate the vertical load on each axle. This can be done by taking the total vehicle weight and dividing it by two (since there are two axles). The vertical load for the front axle would then be 6900 / 2 = 3450 lbs, and the vertical load for the rear axle would be 13500 / 2 = 6750 lbs. We can then use the vertical stiffness of the tires to calculate the spring rate needed for each scenario. For the 0.25 inch bump height, the spring rate should be (3450 + 6750) / 0.25 inches = 26800 lbs/in. For the 1 inch bump height, the spring rate should be (3450 + 6750) / 1 inch = 10700 lbs/in, and for the 2 inch bump height, the spring rate should be (3450 + 6750) / 2 inches = 5350 lbs/in.As far as suspension calculators, there are several available online. Some of the more popular ones include RideTech Suspension Calculator, FEA Suspension Calculator, and ChassisSim Suspension Calculator. These calculators can help you do a sensitivity analysis to determine how different spring rates will affect ride quality.
 

Related to Calculate spring rate in 3 bump scenarios?

1. What is a spring rate?

A spring rate is a measure of the stiffness of a spring. It represents the amount of force required to compress or extend a spring by a certain distance.

2. How is spring rate calculated?

Spring rate is calculated by dividing the force applied to a spring by the resulting change in length of the spring. This can be represented by the equation: Spring Rate = Force / Displacement.

3. What are the three bump scenarios for calculating spring rate?

The three bump scenarios for calculating spring rate are: single bump, double bump, and triple bump. These scenarios involve applying a force to a spring and measuring the resulting displacement in three different situations.

4. How do you calculate spring rate in a single bump scenario?

In a single bump scenario, the spring rate is calculated by dividing the force applied to the spring by the displacement of the spring after the force is removed. This can be represented by the equation: Spring Rate = Force / Single Bump Displacement.

5. What factors can affect the spring rate in a 3 bump scenario?

The spring rate in a 3 bump scenario can be affected by factors such as the material and shape of the spring, the force applied, and the displacement of the spring. Other factors such as temperature and wear and tear can also impact the spring rate.

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