Calculate the temperature measured on the resistance scale

In summary, the conversation is discussing a thermal physics question regarding a wire resistance thermometer and its construction with a material that has a varying resistance as temperature changes. The question asks for the temperature measured on the resistance scale at 70 degrees C on the ideal gas scale. The participants are trying to figure out how to approach the problem and determine the necessary information needed, such as the reference temperature and the units of the constants. The conversation ends with someone asking for help in solving the question.
  • #1
robgb
17
0
Thermal physics question...

A wire resistance thermometer is constructed with material that has a resistance that varies as temperature as below.

R=R0 (1+ alphaT + betaT^2)
where constants alpha and beta are 3.8 x 10^-3 k^-1 and -3.0 x 10^-6 k^-2 respectively.

Calculate the temperature measured on the resistance scale at 70 degrees C on the ideal gas scale.

I've got no idea where to start on this one, any ideas?

Thanks, Rob.
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
You must have the temperature at which the resistance thermometer has resistance R0 or you can't really do the problem. I suppose it could be absolute zero but that's not a very practical thermometer.

Also, the units for the constants don't make sense to me. Do you mean 10 * 103 or k for Kelvin?

Basically the resistance thermometer uses R at some given temperature and a formula for how the resistance varies with temperature. For example, at 0 C suppose R is 1000 ohms and the formula were
R0 + 10 T, then at 25 C, the resistance would be 1000 + 250 ohms.
Here T is relative to reference temperature 0 C.
 
  • #3
I've corrected the values of alpha and beta, does it make more sense now?

I've been told that this question has all the information you need to solve it.

Can anyone help?

Thanks, rob.
 

1. How is temperature measured on the resistance scale?

Temperature on the resistance scale is measured using a device called a thermistor, which is a type of resistor that changes its resistance depending on the temperature. The change in resistance is then converted into a temperature reading using a mathematical formula.

2. What is the formula used to calculate temperature on the resistance scale?

The formula used to calculate temperature on the resistance scale is called the Steinhart-Hart equation. It is a complex mathematical equation that takes into account the resistance values at three different temperatures and uses them to calculate the temperature at the current resistance.

3. What is the unit of measurement for temperature on the resistance scale?

The unit of measurement for temperature on the resistance scale is typically in degrees Celsius (°C) or Kelvin (K). However, it can also be measured in degrees Fahrenheit (°F) or any other temperature unit as long as the conversion is accounted for in the calculation.

4. Is the temperature measured on the resistance scale accurate?

The accuracy of the temperature measured on the resistance scale depends on the accuracy of the thermistor used and the precision of the mathematical formula used for the calculation. With proper calibration and high-quality components, the temperature measured can be very accurate.

5. What are some applications of measuring temperature on the resistance scale?

Measuring temperature on the resistance scale is commonly used in industrial and scientific settings where precise temperature control is necessary. It is also used in household appliances, such as ovens and refrigerators, to monitor and regulate temperature. Additionally, it can be used in weather stations and environmental monitoring to track changes in temperature over time.

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