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Calculating G-Forces

  1. Jun 10, 2012 #1
    Hi,
    I'm trying to figure out the G-Forces a rider will experience whilst riding an amusement park ride.

    The track is 200m long and the 'pod' (What the rider is in) accelerates uniformly at a rate I found to be 5.1m/s2.

    So, to calculate the G-Force, I planned to use the formula g's = a / 9.8m/s, but this gives me a value of 0.52g, which I found unlikely.

    Would anyone be able to point out my error, because I'm fairly certain it's a mistake on my part.
    Thanks
    -iMac_
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 11, 2012 #2

    haruspex

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    The calculation is correct, but remember this is in addition to the ambient 1g, and you haven't said which direction the acceleration is. If the acceleration is straight up then we have a total of 1.52g; if horizontal then √(12+0.522) = 1.13g.
    It doesn't seem much to you because you're so accustomed to the 1g. Consider how it feels when you stand on your head. If memory serves, red-out occurs at about -5g and blackout at +7g.
    OTOH, maybe your 5.1 is wrong?
     
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