Calculating how far it will go

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In summary: In other words, at the instant the box leaves the table, it will have some velocity which you can calculate from the acceleration that it had on the ramp, and that velocity will have both a horizontal and a vertical component. The horizontal component will not change, but the vertical component will be accelerated downward due to the force of gravity. You can find how long it takes to hit the floor by using the quadratic formula to solve for the time it takes the vertical component to be equal to -1.2 meters (the vertical distance it is dropping).In summary, a box with no given mass is sliding down a ramp with a 28 degree angle, with a length of 2m. At the end of the ramp,
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DocDaGeniouss
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A box with no mass given is sliding down a ramp and the degree angle is 28. The ramp is two meters long. When the ramp ends there is a 1.0m table that connects to the ramp. After the table it just drops 1.2 meters to the floor. The friction on the ramp is .33 and .27. The friction on the table is .41 and .36. Part A of the question was to calculate whether the box will move or not. The second part of the problem is to determine whether it will stop sliding across the table or if it will go off the table onto the floor and if so how far away from the table will the box hit the floor

Normal Force = mass x accleration
Normal force = ffr/u

Since i am not given a mass i substituted x in for the mass. I drew out a free body diagram and i calculated the the force going down the ramp is 4.6x . The friction going up the ramp which is the static is 2.85x . Because the force going down the ramp is greater than the static friction the box will move down the ramp. I then did ax = (4.6-2.85)x to find acceleration and got 1.75m/sec^2. I think that part is right.

Now i need to determine how far the box will go, will it stop on the table, if so where, or will it go off the table onto the floor and if so where. I'm really stumped at this point and I am not sure what to do.
 
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Hi DocDaGeniouss,

DocDaGeniouss said:
A box with no mass given is sliding down a ramp and the degree angle is 28. The ramp is two meters long. When the ramp ends there is a 1.0m table that connects to the ramp. After the table it just drops 1.2 meters to the floor. The friction on the ramp is .33 and .27. The friction on the table is .41 and .36. Part A of the question was to calculate whether the box will move or not. The second part of the problem is to determine whether it will stop sliding across the table or if it will go off the table onto the floor and if so how far away from the table will the box hit the floor

Normal Force = mass x accleration
Normal force = ffr/u

Since i am not given a mass i substituted x in for the mass. I drew out a free body diagram and i calculated the the force going down the ramp is 4.6x . The friction going up the ramp which is the static is 2.85x . Because the force going down the ramp is greater than the static friction the box will move down the ramp. I then did ax = (4.6-2.85)x

No, I don't believe that is correct. You have already determined the box is moving. So what type of friction is involved?

to find acceleration and got 1.75m/sec^2. I think that part is right.

Now i need to determine how far the box will go, will it stop on the table, if so where, or will it go off the table onto the floor and if so where. I'm really stumped at this point and I am not sure what to do.

The box will stop if the frictional force from the table is strong enough to stop it in in 1m. You can find the acceleration that is caused by the frictional force. Can you find its velocity at the moment it reaches the table (right after it has left the ramp)? With that you can find the distance required for friction to stop the box, and then compare that with 1 m.

If you find that it doesn't have room to stop, then you can treat the rest of the problem as a projectile problem.
 
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Related to Calculating how far it will go

What is the formula for calculating how far an object will go?

The formula for calculating how far an object will go is d = v * t, where d is the distance traveled, v is the velocity or speed of the object, and t is the time taken to travel.

How do you calculate the velocity of an object?

The velocity of an object can be calculated by dividing the distance traveled by the time taken. In other words, v = d / t.

What units are used for measuring distance and time in this calculation?

The units used for measuring distance and time in this calculation can vary, but some common units include meters (m) and seconds (s). It is important to use consistent units for both distance and time in order to get an accurate calculation.

Can this formula be used for any type of object?

Yes, this formula can be used for any type of object as long as the velocity and time are measured in the same units. However, for objects with varying speeds or acceleration, a more complex formula may be needed.

Is there a limit to how far an object can go using this calculation?

No, there is no limit to how far an object can go using this calculation. However, as the object travels further, external factors such as air resistance and gravity may affect its velocity and distance traveled.

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