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Calculating paint needed

  1. Oct 27, 2011 #1

    wolram

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    Its time for me to do some decorating, the trouble is i all ways seem to need twice as much paint as the suppliers recommend, am i using the wrong method of putting paint on a wall, or are the recommended spread for paint bull s--it
     
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  3. Oct 27, 2011 #2

    Evo

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    I always buy more paint unless it's a very expensive one that's guaranteed to cover with one coat. The cheaper paints tend to need more paint to cover suffiently.

    Also, it could be the type of roller you're using, is it thick and applies heavily? (assuming you're using a roller).

    What colors/rooms are you doing?
     
  4. Oct 27, 2011 #3

    Evo

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    Funny, when I moved in here earlier this month, the apt had changed the wall colour from a cheery pale butter cream color to, well, if you had diarhea...

    My neighbor came over before I started moving in, and when she walked in, she just fell silent and looked around at the walls. I said, "they did this". And she let out a breath and said, oh, I thought maybe you had requested it since they have color options, and I was afraid to say anything.

    :rofl: :frown:
     
  5. Oct 27, 2011 #4
    Yes, the recommended spread for paint is bulls**t. Whatever paint you buy, it will not cover the square footage that it says it will cover. It's not a matter of doing it correctly or not. They're simply not telling the truth on the product labels.
     
  6. Oct 27, 2011 #5

    DaveC426913

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    ...would be the first time in history a brand tried to undersell you on product...
     
  7. Oct 28, 2011 #6

    wolram

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    I will be using soft cream color for my hall way, it doesn't look cream when it's on it is more
    a light yellow.
     
  8. Oct 28, 2011 #7

    Evo

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    Yes, that was the color of mine.
     
  9. Oct 28, 2011 #8
    Don't forget to add a quart for splatter on everything you didn't want to paint but now have to.
     
  10. Oct 28, 2011 #9
    That may be due to the type of lighting in your hallway, is it fluorescent or incandescent? The different spectra they emit can make the same color look significantly different. I used to work in a paint store and we would always recommend to customers that they take a sample or swatch home and see how the color looks in that particular room before they bought several gallons.

    Also, the coverage numbers printed on the cans usually refers to the area covered by a sprayer applying a thin coat, not brushed or rolled. I don't know if every brand makes that distinction clear on their labels though.
     
  11. Oct 28, 2011 #10

    FlexGunship

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    Okay, I know this isn't constructive, but when I saw the thread title I had grouped the words totally differently...

    You intended: [verb] [noun] [adjective] (i.e. I am calculating the paint that is needed.)
    I read it as: [adjective] [noun] [verb] (i.e. Calculating paint needed.)

    Obviously I was interested int this new product known as "calculating paint."
     
  12. Oct 28, 2011 #11
    This is physicsforums.com!

    Find the total surface area you need painted, determine the suggested thickness of the paint and let's do some mathematics!
     
  13. Oct 28, 2011 #12
    Are you counting one coat or two? Plus all the drips, and the paint absorbed by the brushes/rollers. That suggestion about the sprayer makes sense too. The company is probably testing in a lab with uniform coverage and no waste. anyway, as long as you know it takes twice as much, buy extra! But not too much.... My mom bought some dark brown paint for an "accent wall" and then decided she thought it was too dark. Solution? She mixed the dark stuff with white paint until she was comfortable. Result? 800$ worth of paint, and the entire interior of our house which used to be a pleasant yellow is now sadly light brown (because she couldn't stand to waste all that horrible paint she mixed up).

    As for the shade, the lighting can definitely affect it. We have two bathrooms painted in the same shade of light green. One bathroom has round bulbs for lighting and the walls appear pale yellow. The other has fluorescent lights and the walls are distinctly light green.
     
  14. Oct 28, 2011 #13

    Dembadon

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    Not enough constraints! :tongue: :devil:
     
  15. Oct 28, 2011 #14

    micromass

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    That is not worthy for physicsforums!!!!
    Here is what we need to solve: assume that we have an n-dimensional wall...
     
  16. Oct 28, 2011 #15
    Alternatively: Assume the room is perfectly spherical...
     
  17. Nov 2, 2011 #16
    Paint's expensive. Primer is cheap.

    If your new coat is close in color and hue to the previous coat, use a thin nap roller. A single coat of a good quality paint should do it. If it's significantly different, it's cheaper to use a same-hue primer, followed by a second thin-nap coat of the actual paint. I'd still recommend a good quality paint.

    Your best bet these days is to check with both Home Depot and Lowes paint departments. Neither have let me down since I started repainting my digs in the early 80s.
     
  18. Nov 2, 2011 #17

    Pythagorean

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    Me too, I thought it was going to be that paint-on white board stuff they have now. It's like $70 though for enough to paint about one board worth.
     
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