Calculating Wave Travel Time Along a String

In summary, A continuous succession of sinusoidal wave pulses are produced at one end of a very long string and travels along the length of the string. Given the frequency, amplitude, wavelength, and time, we can use the formulas T = 1/f, lamda = v/f, w = 2f*pi = vk, and d = vt to find the velocity of the wave and the time it takes for it to travel a certain distance along the string. We can also use the formula d = vt to find the time it takes for a point on the string to travel a certain distance once the wave has reached it and set it into motion. It is important to note the direction of travel and consider the total distance traveled in one
  • #1
sghaussi
33
0
A continuous succession of sinusoidal wave pulses are produced at one end of a very long string and travels along the length of the string.

I am given the frequency, amplitude, and wavelength.

I know: T = 1/f & lamda = v/f & w=2f*pi=vk


I have f, A, lamda, and T. I am also given x.

How long does it take the wave to travel a distance of X meters along the length of the sting?

How long does it take a point ont eh string to travel a distance of X meters once the wave train has reached the point and set into motion?


Can anyone help me start this problem??
 
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  • #2
do i need to find the velocity function for the first question or the second question? i don't understand how they are related?
 
  • #3
another formula you should know: d=vt . Here, d is "x." You have enough to find v, so what is t?

I am assuming that the point on the string travels a total "distance" of "X" meters (as opposed to displacement).This direction of t4ravel is up and down. Think: what is the distance that a point on a string will travel in one full oscillation?
 

Related to Calculating Wave Travel Time Along a String

1. How is wave travel time along a string calculated?

Wave travel time along a string can be calculated using the formula T = L/c, where T is the travel time, L is the length of the string, and c is the speed of the wave.

2. What is the speed of a wave along a string?

The speed of a wave along a string is dependent on the tension and mass per unit length of the string. It can be calculated using the equation c = √(T/μ), where c is the speed, T is the tension, and μ is the mass per unit length.

3. How does the tension of a string affect the wave travel time?

The tension of a string affects the wave travel time by increasing the speed of the wave. As the tension increases, the speed of the wave also increases, leading to a shorter travel time along the string.

4. What happens to the wave travel time if the length of the string is doubled?

If the length of the string is doubled, the wave travel time will also double. This is because the distance the wave needs to travel has increased, resulting in a longer travel time.

5. Can the wave travel time along a string be affected by the type of material used?

Yes, the type of material used for the string can affect the wave travel time. Different materials have different mass per unit length and can therefore affect the speed of the wave. For example, a lighter string will have a higher speed and shorter travel time compared to a heavier string.

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