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Calculus Classes

  1. Mar 17, 2003 #1
    First of all, I recently purchased a Calculus book for a real bargain: $ 0.75 + tax! I spent spring break giving myself a refresher course. Whee!

    On to business: I think Calculus classes deserve special mention. They are among the very rare classes where cheat sheets are not only permitted, but required. Gotta love those integration tables! They're sometimes 30+ pages long, but...oh, well.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 17, 2003 #2
    really? i don't recall anything like that when i took calc. no cheatsheets, no calculators.
     
  4. Mar 17, 2003 #3
    Cheet sheets? I'm not sure what they are. Can anyone tell me?
     
  5. Mar 17, 2003 #4
    Cheat sheets are in reference to the table of integrals.

    Not necessarily a "cheat sheet" but rather a useful reference to classes of integrals (like Wallis formulas and things like that).

    I remember haveing to use that when I took Calculus II last year. It saved me a lot of time (but I didn't rely on it so much).
     
  6. Mar 17, 2003 #5
    Welcome to the wonderful world of mathematics! In my upper-level math classes in college, like ~90% of the exams were open-book and open-note, and many were also infinite-time!
     
  7. Mar 18, 2003 #6
    Wow, we didn't have open book or open note test (and the way how our books were written, it was better to go with out it).

    Speaking of infinite time, that reminded me of Calculus II exams. I remember doing one chapter on Integral techniques and there was one particular problem that remained elusive to me. I probably spent a good 2 or 3 hours on that particular problem and the great thing is that the professor allowed me all the time I needed.

    Of course, hunger pains and thirst began to set in, my eyes were strained and my hand aching, so I had to call it a day.
     
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