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Homework Help: Calculus Integral

  1. Oct 31, 2007 #1
    Can anyone help me with the integral of cos(y^2)?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 31, 2007 #2

    cristo

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    Possibly. Can you reduce cos(y^2) down and express it in terms of sin(y) and cos(y)?
     
  4. Oct 31, 2007 #3
    not really. I'm finding functions, given the gradient...

    ((e^x)*cos(y^2))i - (2y(e^x)sin(y^2))j
     
  5. Oct 31, 2007 #4

    cristo

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    I reckon you can. How about if you write cos(2y)=cos(y+y)=...
     
  6. Nov 1, 2007 #5

    Gib Z

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    cristo - its cos (y^2), not 2y :(

    caaron3 - it has no elementary solution, though if you really want some sort of a solution, the anti derivative is in terms of the Cosine Fresnel Integral, so look that up.
     
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