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Calibrating an instrument

  1. Oct 10, 2007 #1

    wolram

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    How would one calibrate an instrument in deep space, the instrument must be set to a zero point and the instrument could be effected by any force.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2007 #2

    f95toli

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    I think the question is a bit too general. You need to specify what type of instrument it is, what "any force" means and the desired accuracy.
    There are two ways to calibrate an instrument: Measuring a known quantity (usually a secondary standard) or by directly comparing it to a primary standard.
    Time, temperature, voltage and resistance are examples of quantities where you can quite easily make and measure a primary standard with reasonable accuracy. Calibrating a scale (weight) is much harder since you need an artifact.
     
  4. Oct 10, 2007 #3

    wolram

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    This harder than i thought, is there a way to find zero energy level, given that any of a range of instuments would be in deep space?
     
  5. Oct 11, 2007 #4

    wolram

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    May be if i ask ,what is deemed to be a zero energy energy point?

    Edit

    Given that (i think some gravity will exisit).
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2007
  6. Oct 11, 2007 #5

    wolram

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    If it was possible to screen off a volume of space from all outside influences, i guess there would still be energy in that volume, and as energy can be positive as well as negative (what would be the null point)?
     
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