Calorimetry copper pot problem

In summary, the problem involves a copper pot containing 0.170kg of water at 20C and a 0.250kg block of iron at 85C. In order to find the final temperature with no heat loss, the equation Qwater + Qiron + Qcopper = 0 is used, where Q represents the heat transfer for each component. The equation can be simplified to m_{copper}c_{copper}(T_{final} - T_{initial copper}) + m_{water}c_{water}(T_{final} - T_{initial water}) + m_{iron}c_{iron}(T_{final} - T_{initial iron}) = 0, and the final temperature can
  • #1
ziddy83
87
0
Hey what's up,
I am stuck on the following problem.

a copper pot with mass of 0.5kg contains 0.170kg of water at a temperature of 20C. A 0.250kg block of iron at 85C is dropped into the pot. Find the final temperature assuming not heat loss.

Ok, so Here is what i was thinking about doing:

Qwater + Qiron + Qcopper = 0

i know the initial temperature of the system, 20C. i also know the temp of the Iron block. so...How do i find the final T? Q = mc(Delta T), the delta T part is where I am confused. How do i set up the equation so i can solve for Tfinal? Thanks for any help.
 
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  • #2
Your equation is set up correctly.

[tex] \Delta T = T_{final} - T_{initial} [/tex]

Just use the idea of

[tex] m_{copper}c_{copper}(T_{final} - T_{initial copper}) + m_{water}c_{water}(T_{final} - T_{initial water}) + m_{iron}c_{iron}(T_{final} - T_{initial iron}) = 0[/tex]

Use Distributive of product with respect to addition property, then factor the T final.
 
  • #3
Sweet...thanks a lot man.
 

Related to Calorimetry copper pot problem

What is the "Calorimetry copper pot problem"?

The "Calorimetry copper pot problem" is a common experiment in thermodynamics that involves heating a copper pot with boiling water and then calculating the specific heat capacity of the pot.

Why is the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" important?

The "Calorimetry copper pot problem" is important because it allows scientists to determine the specific heat capacity of a material, which is a crucial factor in understanding its thermal properties and conducting further research.

How do you conduct the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" experiment?

To conduct the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" experiment, you will need a copper pot, boiling water, a thermometer, and a calorimeter. First, place the copper pot in the calorimeter and add boiling water to it. Measure the initial and final temperatures of the water and the pot and use these values to calculate the specific heat capacity of the pot.

What are the common sources of error in the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" experiment?

Common sources of error in the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" experiment include heat loss to the surroundings, incomplete mixing of the water and the pot, and inaccuracies in temperature measurement. It is important to control these factors to ensure accurate results.

How can the results of the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" experiment be applied in real-world situations?

The results of the "Calorimetry copper pot problem" experiment can be applied in many real-world situations, such as designing efficient heating systems, understanding the thermal properties of different materials, and predicting the amount of heat transfer in various processes.

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