Can an Adiabatic Process be Isothermal?

  • Thread starter flythisforme
  • Start date
In summary, during an adiabatic process where dQ is zero, the change in temperature, work done, and change in internal energy are also equal to zero. However, it is not possible for an adiabatic process to also be isothermal. In the given problem, A->B is isobaric, B->C is adiabatic, C->D is isothermal, and D->A is isochoric. The temperatures of B and C are both equal to 2.44x10^4 K, and the user is unsure of what they are doing wrong. They have posted their work in a new thread for further assistance.
  • #1
flythisforme
19
0
In an adiabatic process, I know that that dQ is zero. I am doing a problem with a cycle that has different types of processes, and when I get to the adiabatic leg, I am finding that the change in temperature is zero. Therefore, the work done and the change in internal energy also equal zero.

Is this possible? Can an adiabatic process also have no change in temperature, therefore being isothermal?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #3
OK, so in the problem A->B is isobaric, B->C is adiabatic, C->D is isothermal, D->A is isochoric.

Pa = 2atm, Va = 2 m^3, n = 1mole, Vb = 1/2Va, Pa = 2Pd

I always end up with the temperatures of B and C both equaling 2.44x10^4 K. What am I doing wrong?
 
  • #4
I'm going to make a new post of this since it's really no longer a "small question."
 
  • #5
How come you end up with equal temp.?Post your work.

Daniel.
 
  • #6
I posted my work in a new thread since it is not a small problem anymore.
 

Related to Can an Adiabatic Process be Isothermal?

1. What is an adiabatic process?

An adiabatic process is a thermodynamic process in which there is no heat transfer between the system and its surroundings. This means that the energy of the system remains constant throughout the process.

2. Can an adiabatic process be isothermal?

No, an adiabatic process cannot be isothermal. In an isothermal process, the temperature of the system remains constant, which means that there is no change in its internal energy. However, in an adiabatic process, the internal energy of the system can change due to work done on or by the system.

3. What is the difference between an adiabatic and an isothermal process?

The main difference between an adiabatic and an isothermal process is that in an adiabatic process, there is no heat transfer between the system and its surroundings, while in an isothermal process, the temperature of the system remains constant. This means that in an adiabatic process, the internal energy of the system can change, while in an isothermal process, it remains constant.

4. Why is an adiabatic process important?

An adiabatic process is important because it allows us to study the behavior of a system when there is no heat transfer. This is useful in understanding the efficiency of various thermodynamic processes and in designing systems that can operate without heat loss or gain.

5. What are some examples of adiabatic processes?

Some examples of adiabatic processes include the compression or expansion of a gas in a cylinder, the flow of air in a jet engine, and the expansion of a balloon. In all of these processes, there is no heat transfer, but there can be a change in the internal energy of the system due to work done on or by the system.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
229
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
952
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
867
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
792
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
237
Back
Top