Can anyone help?

  • #1
Hi, I have a query with an example as I wish to discover if this has a specific name within physics.

A sealed jar is half filled with a viscous liquid. I then shake the jar continuously with the liquid impacting against the lid.

Is this merely momentum? energy transfer perhaps?
All suggestions/answers are appreciated.

RikkoSuperb
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
980
2
Oil sloshing about a jar? What's the specific phenomenon that's being considered here?
 
  • #3
3,003
2
Hi, I have a query with an example as I wish to discover if this has a specific name within physics.

A sealed jar is half filled with a viscous liquid. I then shake the jar continuously with the liquid impacting against the lid.

Is this merely momentum? energy transfer perhaps?
All suggestions/answers are appreciated.

RikkoSuperb
I am not sure what the question is.
 
  • #4
The liquid uses the motion to exert a force/pressure on the lid. What can this action be described as?
 
  • #5
18
0
Newton's third law.
 
  • #6
3,077
4
I once proposed a similar situation, and was shown to use both conservation of energy and momentum to determine whether the maximum miscibility (e. g., energy and momentum transfer) occurred when the jar was half full.

My guess proved correct.
 
  • #7
symbolipoint
Homework Helper
Education Advisor
Gold Member
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From the viewpoint of someone who is not a rheologist and not a physicist:

You are mixing air with liquid; is it turbulance? Low surface tension in relation to the force placed on the liquid? Does the situation have a name?
 
  • #8
2
0
Hi, I have a query with an example as I wish to discover if this has a specific name within physics.

A sealed jar is half filled with a viscous liquid. I then shake the jar continuously with the liquid impacting against the lid.

Is this merely momentum? energy transfer perhaps?
All suggestions/answers are appreciated.

Hey, due to the shaking of the jar energy is added to the liquid. Part of it is observed larger momentum of the liquid particles as so-called particles (molecules) and another part is due to the fact that electrons of these molecules also take on angular momentum from these collisions and as a result increase in temp. For example an electron can become excited into an unstable higher angular momentum state and after some time goes to its stable lower energy again while emitting a photon with the energy difference between these two so-called "eigen"-states. The same is valid for the nucleus which consist of protons and neutrons which are build from so-called quarks. This QCD theory is not yet clearly understood, but in the description the same characteristics appear.

Besides, all physics is relativistic, and conservation of the total energy and momentum always requires the energy and the momentum of an observed part of a system to in- or de-crease as: E = SQR(m2c4+c2p2)
In fact all added energy of the liquid is kinetic, i.e. the particles get higher velocities with respect to the shaking observer, but also with respect to the particles of the liquid. The last, due to increased angular momentum of the particles and increased relative momentum between the liquid particles themselves.

Tom de Hoop: tomdehoop@zeelandnet.nl
 
  • #9
From the viewpoint of someone who is not a rheologist and not a physicist:

You are mixing air with liquid; is it turbulance? Low surface tension in relation to the force placed on the liquid? Does the situation have a name?
good point, i am not a physics master but would any turbulence be created? If it where and on this scale, surely it would be minimal.
 
  • #10
tom1661, you said,

"Besides, all physics is relativistic, and conservation of the total energy and momentum always requires the energy and the momentum of an observed part of a system to in- or de-crease as: E = SQR(m2c4+c2p2)
In fact all added energy of the liquid is kinetic, i.e. the particles get higher velocities with respect to the shaking observer, but also with respect to the particles of the liquid. The last, due to increased angular momentum of the particles and increased relative momentum between the liquid particles themselves."

Would the energy transfered from the observer be magnified by the liquid once it has impacted with the lid? Sorry if this seems a dumb questions but I am more of a programming expert than a physicist. Thanks for the interesting discussion so far guys :)
 
  • #11
tom1661 said,

"Besides, all physics is relativistic, and conservation of the total energy and momentum always requires the energy and the momentum of an observed part of a system to in- or de-crease as: E = SQR(m2c4+c2p2)
In fact all added energy of the liquid is kinetic, i.e. the particles get higher velocities with respect to the shaking observer, but also with respect to the particles of the liquid. The last, due to increased angular momentum of the particles and increased relative momentum between the liquid particles themselves."

would the energy transfered from the observer be magnified by the liquid thereby increasing the impact on collision with the lid? sorry if this is silly but i am a programmer and not a physicist.
 
  • #12
2
0
tom1661, you said,

"Besides, all physics is relativistic, and conservation of the total energy and momentum always requires the energy and the momentum of an observed part of a system to in- or de-crease as: E = SQR(m2c4+c2p2)
In fact all added energy of the liquid is kinetic, i.e. the particles get higher velocities with respect to the shaking observer, but also with respect to the particles of the liquid. The last, due to increased angular momentum of the particles and increased relative momentum between the liquid particles themselves."

Would the energy transfered from the observer be magnified by the liquid once it has impacted with the lid? Sorry if this seems a dumb questions but I am more of a programming expert than a physicist. Thanks for the interesting discussion so far guys :)
All liquid molecules together collide as a liquid. As a result of the shaking of the jar the wavelike character will become turbulent. But this is just a way in which the added energy due to the shaking of the jar is observed. There is no magnification of the energy due to the liquid. Energy cannot be created out of nothing. Most physical processes describe nothing else than energy transfer between observed bodies. This is called work. A little part of the energy transferred to the liquid during collision with the shelf is transferred into sound waves through which you hear the liquid colliding with the jar. So not all energy used to shake the jar will be transferred to the liquid, but almost all will be transferred.

Greetings Tom.
 
  • #13
794
1
It sounds like a milk shake

--------------------

oh and if it were eggs, it would eventually be an omelette
 
Last edited:
  • #14
many thanks tom1661
 

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