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B Can humans eventually know all

  1. Mar 11, 2017 #1
    i have a bit of an interest in particle physics, however im by no means smart or uni educated. so try to keep your answers in laymans terms.


    im curious about something.
    as human knowledge progresses, we learned about the atom, and then electron proton neutron. and then photons. however im assuming beyond that is theoretical?

    lets say if god or ghosts exist, would they have to consist of something?
    meaning as humans learn, can we eventually know and prove the smallest building blocks so the we essentially know or become god?

    so if string theory eventually becomes common knowledge for us, and this turns out to be the universes absolute smallest building block, would that mean that we would have the knowledge to prove or disprove god, or know what a ghost is. would it be that no knowledge is beyond us?

    or are the smallest building blocks so small that we could never ever know whet they are?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 11, 2017 #2

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    There is no way to prove that contemporary knowledge will ever be the "end-all-be-all" of physics. It may be that our future theories are simply very, very good approximations of the actual laws of the universe and the differences are just too small to measure. Nor is there any way to prove that something such as ghosts or god doesn't exist. It may be that there are things in the universe which are simply beyond our ability to ever observe, yet exist anyways. Whether we can make accurate claims (but not absolute claims) about whether they do or do not exist is debatable.

    Since this deals primarily with philosophical issues, I'm going to go ahead and lock this thread. But here are a few links that may be of use:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_science
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_realism
     
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