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Other Can I get a Ph.D. in physics if my bachelor's degree isn't in physics

  1. Nov 27, 2016 #141

    ZapperZ

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    You seem to have the wrong idea about the intention of this thread.

    There is NO GUARANTEE implied anywhere in this thread of (i) getting admitted and (ii) getting through a PhD Physics program.

    Unless you are willing to enroll in more classes, then take your GRE, submit your applications, and sit back and wait. What else do you think you can do?

    Zz.
     
  2. Nov 27, 2016 #142

    Well, being in my situation, I guess there isn't much I can do since I'm not a student so I can't really just take upper division physics courses. But I could claim that I have done physics in my applied classes. For example, I have modeled different orbital/hyperbolic trajectories and energies starting from various escape velocities, something a physics phd told me is not a trivial problem. And I have learned how to estimate likelihood parameters using hamiltonian monte carlo. Also an application borrowed from physics. In one of my diff eqs classes, I have modeled phase spaces of a physical pendulum( undamped and damped etc). Unfortunately, none of those courses have the title of physics. But I suppose I could just explain in the app.


    I guess I should just self study for the gre then. Is that what you would do if you were in my situation?
     
  3. Dec 3, 2017 #143
    Hi,

    I'm taking pre reqs to get into a Phd in Computer Science program. I plan on entering in fall of 2019.

    That said, I have an interest in Quantum Information/Computing. Is it possible for me to self study for a sufficient background in Physics come fall 2019? i.e about 2 years? The equivalent of doing well on the Physics GRE.

    I do not have any Physics background, but have a decently strong applied math background.
     
  4. Dec 3, 2017 #144

    ZapperZ

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    I pointed this thread to you with the hope that (i) you actually read the advice that I gave in the very first post and (ii) that you are able to do your own self-evaluation.

    This is NOT the thread to answer your particular question. You are missing the whole point of this thread and my reason for pointing this out to you!

    Zz.
     
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