Can My Laptop Work in USA and What Kind of Plugs Do They Use?

  • Thread starter Clausius2
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Laptop Usa
In summary: Thanks for the link!In summary, the converter kit you buy usually comes with an assortment of adaptors. You will need an adaptor for your plug if it is different in voltage than what you are used to, and you will need a cord if your power supply is rated for 60Hz /120VAC.
  • #1
Clausius2
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,440
7
Hi!

I am planning to carry my laptop to USA, if finally I fly there. But I don't know if it can work properly in USA. Although in the transformer it says "50-60Hz", I am not sure. Have you got any problem those who usually travel from Europe to USA?.

Also, I don't know exactly how are the electrical plugs and sockets in USA. My plug has two connections. I heard that USA ones have three. Is it true?

Thanks.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Clausius2 said:
Hi!

I am planning to carry my laptop to USA, if finally I fly there. But I don't know if it can work properly in USA. Although in the transformer it says "50-60Hz", I am not sure. Have you got any problem those who usually travel from Europe to USA?.

Also, I don't know exactly how are the electrical plugs and sockets in USA. My plug has two connections. I heard that USA ones have three. Is it true?

Thanks.
When I travel to Europe, I use an electrical converter that converts both the plug and the voltage. I use my laptop in Europe using the adaptor without any trouble.

Some plugs in the US have a third prong for grounding. The converter kit you buy usually comes with an assortment of adaptors.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
In the US you will find 120VAC in a 3 wire configuration. You may need to get a cord. If your power supply is rated for 60Hz /120VAC

I am wondering about the same thing, as I may be heading to Europe this summer. I see the transformer/charger on mine is rated for 50/60 Hz and 120- 240V so it looks like I should only need a cord.
 
  • #4
Evo said:
When I travel to Europe, I use an electrical converter that converts both the plug and the voltage. I use my laptop in Europe using the converter without any trouble.

Some plugs in the US have a third prong for grounding. The converter kit you buy usually comes with an assortment of adaptors.

Thanks to the most beautiful girl in PF!

So, you mean I need an adaptor for

i) the plug. Is it different in USA? Here we have two prongs in the plug.
ii) voltage. Here the voltage is 220V. How is it in USA?
iii) you didn't mention frequency. Is it necessary to adapt it too?.
 
  • #5
Yeah in the US, it would be called a "reverse voltage converter", where you would plug the device into an american wall socket, and then just plug your (european) device into it. Here they are sold at radioshack, and a bunch of other places I'm sure. Just make sure that the output is rated at like less than a hundred watts, and not like 1500 watts or something, since the one rated with the higher wattage will fry sensitive electronic devices.

Additionally, this will convert 60 hz american signal to the 50 hz (or whatever it supposed to be in europe)
 
Last edited:
  • #6
Integral said:
In the US you will find 120VAC in a 3 wire configuration. You may need to get a cord. If your power supply is rated for 60Hz /120VAC

I am wondering about the same thing, as I may be heading to Europe this summer. I see the transformer/charger on mine is rated for 50/60 Hz and 120- 240V so it looks like I should only need a cord.

Yes, my transformer is rated the same!.

But I have an english problem. What is "a cord"?. I think I don't have the idea about what is a cord talking about this stuff.
 
  • #7
Integral said:
In the US you will find 120VAC in a 3 wire configuration. You may need to get a cord. If your power supply is rated for 60Hz /120VAC

I am wondering about the same thing, as I may be heading to Europe this summer. I see the transformer/charger on mine is rated for 50/60 Hz and 120- 240V so it looks like I should only need a cord.
Any of the dual voltage devices only require an adaptor.

http://www.brookstone.com/shop/thumbnail.asp?world_code=4&category_code=39&search_type=subcategory&cm_ven=Search&cm_cat=Google&cm_pla=Bidword&cm_ite=electric%20converter
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #8
Clausius2 said:
Yes, my transformer is rated the same!.

But I have an english problem. What is "a cord"?. I think I don't have the idea about what is a cord talking about this stuff.
The cord is the wire from your computer with prongs on the end that plugs into the electrical outlet. You won't need a different cord, just an adaptor. You plug your cord into the adptor, then plug it into the outlet.

Integral, appliances like hairdryers are normally dual voltage also, you just need the adaptor.
 
  • #9
This site has many different adaptors.

http://www.goinginstyle.com/gis/body_sub_new.asp?dept_id=2
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #10
This site comes with pictures of the different types of plugs in different countries (click on the letters in the column labeled "plug"). That should help clarify things. Our outlets in the US are often "polarized" too, which means one of the holes is a little bigger than the other. For things where the direction of current is important, the plug will have one prong bigger than the other so it will only fit in the outlet one way.

http://kropla.com/electric2.htm
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #11
Thanks Everyone!
 
  • #12
I know that this has been answered, but Laptops are one of the things which have transformers which work bassically anywhere... I've used laptops from here in europe, etc.. I once bought a laptop here and gave it to someone in europe.
 
  • #13
moose said:
I know that this has been answered, but Laptops are one of the things which have transformers which work bassically anywhere... I've used laptops from here in europe, etc.. I once bought a laptop here and gave it to someone in europe.

Thanks moose. Anyway, I have to buy an adapter for the plug shape.
 
  • #14
Clausius2 said:
Thanks moose. Anyway, I have to buy an adapter for the plug shape.

Well, the best alternative would be instead of an adapter(which can cost about 3 dollars...) is, you know the cable which goes from the wall outlet to the transformer? If you buy one of those, you won't even need an adapter for plug shape, since it will be already for american outlets. This way you don't have to worry about the cheapness of most adapters. This cable should be easy to find since it's used for a lot of stereo systems and such.

Just my .02

EDIT: It actually depends on how long you actually plan to stay here.
 
  • #15
moose said:
Well, the best alternative would be instead of an adapter(which can cost about 3 dollars...) is, you know the cable which goes from the wall outlet to the transformer? If you buy one of those, you won't even need an adapter for plug shape, since it will be already for american outlets. This way you don't have to worry about the cheapness of most adapters. This cable should be easy to find since it's used for a lot of stereo systems and such.

Just my .02

EDIT: It actually depends on how long you actually plan to stay here.
I disagree, an adapter is cheap and can be used for any number of appliances he might need, like a hair dryer, or a PDA, or cell phone. I have used a couple of different laptops and the electrical cord is not interchangeable on them (I can't take the power cord from one and use it with the other).
 
  • #16
Evo said:
I disagree, an adapter is cheap and can be used for any number of appliances he might need, like a hair dryer, or a PDA, or cell phone. I have used a couple of different laptops and the electrical cord is not interchangeable on them (I can't take the power cord from one and use it with the other).

Don't worry, Evo. I will make it as you said, but please, give me your address. It is because if my laptop gets burned being your blame, I will look for you to return me my money... :rofl:
 
  • #17
Evo said:
I disagree, an adapter is cheap and can be used for any number of appliances he might need, like a hair dryer, or a PDA, or cell phone. I have used a couple of different laptops and the electrical cord is not interchangeable on them (I can't take the power cord from one and use it with the other).

You have a point, I forgot he may have different appliances... Just make sure that your appliances CAN be used here O.O
The items you listed should be able to though... That is weird that it wasn't interchangeable considering that It's always been for me... Maybe I've been lucky so far, who knows.
 

1. What is the significance of 60 Hz in the USA?

In the USA, the standard frequency for electrical power is 60 Hz. This means that the alternating current (AC) cycles 60 times per second. This frequency is important because it allows for efficient transmission of electricity and is compatible with most electronic devices used in the country.

2. Why does my laptop have a 60 Hz refresh rate?

Your laptop's screen has a refresh rate of 60 Hz because it is designed to match the standard power frequency in the USA. This ensures that the screen's image is stable and does not flicker. It also allows for smoother visuals and prevents eye strain.

3. Can I use my laptop with a different frequency in another country?

It depends on the country's power frequency. If the country uses 60 Hz, then your laptop should work without any issues. However, if the frequency is different (e.g. 50 Hz), it may cause problems with your laptop's performance and potentially damage the device. It is best to check the country's power frequency before using your laptop abroad.

4. How does 60 Hz affect the performance of my laptop?

The 60 Hz frequency has no direct impact on the performance of your laptop. However, if the power supply is unstable or fluctuates, it can affect the performance of your device. This is why it is important to use a surge protector to regulate the power supply and protect your laptop from potential damage.

5. Can I change the 60 Hz frequency on my laptop?

No, the frequency on your laptop is determined by the power supply and cannot be changed. Attempting to do so may cause damage to your device. If you are experiencing issues with your laptop's performance, it is best to consult a professional technician.

Similar threads

  • General Discussion
Replies
12
Views
962
Replies
1
Views
897
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
27
Views
1K
Replies
15
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
904
  • New Member Introductions
Replies
1
Views
509
  • Computing and Technology
Replies
15
Views
4K
Replies
3
Views
676
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
10
Views
2K
Back
Top