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B Can scientists control gravity?

  1. Nov 4, 2016 #1

    wolram

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    Is this line of research a reality?

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160108083918.htm

    Produce and detect gravitational fields at will using magnetic fields, control them for studying them, work with them to produce new technologies -- it sounds daring, but Prof. André Füzfa of Namur University has proposed just that in an article published in the scientific journal Physical Review D. If followed, this proposal could transform physics and shake up Einstein's theory of general relativity.
     
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  3. Nov 4, 2016 #2

    Jonathan Scott

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  4. Nov 4, 2016 #3
    Hmmmmm... When I was an undergrad studying physics we did an experiment to measure gravity. We took a cassette tape and unwound it, hung it down the three story stairwell of the science building. At the end of the tape, we attached a stiff metal rod with a ball bearing at each end. Took some doing to set up. But the twist of the cassette tape medium was such that if we brought a 400 pound barrel of sand close to one of the ball bearing, the tape would twist due to the gravity between the barrel of sand and the ball bearing. It was a very tiny force. But the deflection was clearly real, the ball bearing moved towards the sand. We continued to use different masses bringing them near and sure enough Gmm/r matched the gravitational force that should have been there. So making gravity waves is, in some sense, quite trivial, just take any mass and shake it. As I understand it, the gravity waves travel at the speed of light. But that was way beyond the scope of the experiment.
     
  5. Nov 4, 2016 #4

    CWatters

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  6. Nov 4, 2016 #5
    From How current loops and solenoids curve space-time

    I suspect a mouse sneezing on the other side of the world would introduce enough noise to swamp the phase shift.

    Interestingly, this is the first Arxiv paper I've ever seen with its self referential hyperlink disabled.
     
  7. Nov 4, 2016 #6
    For years I have been trying to get the folks at CERN to allow USN to set up a michelson-morley interferometer in close proximity to the matter stream of the collider. The postulate is that the fast moving particles should produce the type of shift that they were looking for in the first place. But for different reasons. Basically the particle beam should have a three dimensional gravitational wake, like a boat on a lake, and the interferometer, set up in the correct orientation to maximize phase shhift across the gravitational wake should allow for direct detection of the standing gravity wave I think might be there..
     
  8. Nov 4, 2016 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    Where on CDS can I find the proposal?
     
  9. Nov 4, 2016 #8
    I can't, right now, deal with the culture shock on Physics Forum. But that is neither here nor there. There is no CDS proposal to find because the effort predates The Internet. I'ts ancient history to some. You are obviously older and wiser than some of the young moderators, so you have been around the block, and seen a thing or two. What do you actually know about CERN culture, and can you get an idea on their agenda? I can work wonders within the US Defense Department. But I am not motivated by profit. These kids should learn how to deal with organizational cultures. You practically need an Ambassador just to say hello. Of course it's entirely likely that they have never run across an empirical, lopezian, navy, science officer before. It takes time to build relationships. And it is hard, but not impossible, to forge a long distance relationship with like minded individuals.

    1. I already tried this experiment once in Texas, but that collider never was finished. It showed some promise, but we needed to work out a lot of details, and it became a matter of national security. Still is. How gravity waves became a national security issue is a good story, but for another day.. I can offer to put together a team who will be capable of executing the experiment. This is not a small job. It's not overwhelming either, but these physics kids (god bless their brains) do not understand the nexus of science, military, and technology.
     
  10. Nov 4, 2016 #9

    Vanadium 50

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    Which collider are you talking about? Proposals from the LHC, SppS, LEP and the ISR eras are all online. They might have been scanned in, but they're there. I remember a couple of years back having to find the UA5 proposal from the 70's. No problem.

    Then maybe you shouldn't be talking about it on the internet. Just sayin'.
     
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