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Can someone help me here?

  1. Sep 9, 2006 #1

    JasonRox

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    I read this about comic publishing. I'm not familiar with it.

    - comics (when placed on the page) must be at least 200dpi, 10”x2”, CMYK
    *.tif
    files with no layers.

    I'm going to simply create the comic on Paint. The basic program you get.

    I know I can save it in terms of inches and as a file of *.tif.

    What's with the layers and 200dpi?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 9, 2006 #2

    Mk

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    200 dpi is concerning to print quality, how many ink "dots per square inch."

    They want files with no layers, as in, don't do it in Photoshop, I am guessing, because tiffs aren't layered.
     
  4. Sep 9, 2006 #3

    JasonRox

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    Since I'm drawing in Paint, I probably don't have to worry about that.
     
  5. Sep 9, 2006 #4

    Moonbear

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    All of that could be done in PhotoShop. If you created it as layers in PhotoShop, you just have to flatten the image for the final copy.

    Can you convert it to CMYK in Paint? That's important for the printing. It'll look like crap on the screen, because your monitor displays best in RGB mode, but for commercial printing, they need to separate the colors differently for their printers. That's what CMYK is referring to.

    dpi is the resolution, and again, I know you can change that easily in PhotoShop, but I don't know about Paint.
     
  6. Sep 9, 2006 #5

    Mk

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    Yeah, and if you're saving at is tiff and not psd, than what do you worry about the layers for?

    Can you do that in Photoshop? I remember the color choices as monochrome, greyscale, and RGB. I'll check later. I would be glad to convert it if you want. I thought CMYK was for printing, and it did not matter what the file said about it.
     
  7. Sep 10, 2006 #6
    I just took an image to paint, put some graffitti on it and then hit file--->save as. A window comes up which gives you a drop down menu as to what type of image you want to save it as. Tiff is one of the options, so you can do this with paint.
     
  8. Sep 10, 2006 #7

    JasonRox

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    Well, I hope it's good enough.

    I'll try to get a copy of photoshop somewhere.
     
  9. Sep 10, 2006 #8
    I can't figure out if CYMK is a kind of file or just a printer setting.
     
  10. Sep 10, 2006 #9

    JasonRox

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    I think it's a color configuration thing on the computer, so that the colors you want print out as the colors you see on the screen.
     
  11. Sep 10, 2006 #10
    Use 'The gimp' Its free and as powerful as photoshop, plus you are supporting open source.
     
  12. Sep 10, 2006 #11

    shmoe

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    They won't look quite like you see on the screen. Your screen uses Red, Green, Blue to make the images, the printer uses Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK, you won't be able to get a perfect match. The advantage of working in CMYK is you wouldn't be relying on the printer converting from rgb->cmyk, so you do at least know what will be sent to your printer. If you really want to know what colour it will be when printed you could get printed cmyk colour samples.

    The gimp doesn't have cmyk support built in, but there are plug-ins available that appear to be somewhat in the testing stage (I haven't tried them). It's free though, so that's nice of course. Places like kinkos will have photoshop you can use (pay for computer time) if you don't know anyone who has it. Either will let you adjust the dpi and image size. Though of course you can't really add more resolution without looking like garbage, so if you are making your image in paint, make sure to have enough pixels (I don't think it has any options except essentially the pixel count).
     
  13. Sep 10, 2006 #12

    Moonbear

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    I'm not sure what it does for printing, but it reduces the file size considerably not to save all the layers. But, I always do that as the very last step, because of course you create the layers so you can move them around as you're editing. Once in a blue moon, I've had trouble with layers that seemed to disappear when printed even though they were clearly visible on the screen, so flattening the image prevents that from happening.

    Or are you unaware that layers are preserved in tiff files as well as psd files? You only lose the layers in more compressed formats, like jpeg files.

    I don't know what Paint does, but I'm assuming if you can move around all the elements in an image independently, it's including layers.


    Yes, you can do that in PhotoShop, and it IS for printing. It's the way commercial printers separate out the colors in color images, so if it's already saved that way, you'll know what you're getting and can adjust it better. You can convert to CMYK at the end, but I've never liked the result, so anything that's going to be used entirely for publishing, I prefer working in CMYK right from the start.
     
  14. Sep 10, 2006 #13

    DaveC426913

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    And of course, that's just process colours. There's also spot colours...

    But stick with process for what you're doing.


    Process colours: every colour, shade and tint is created from a blend of just a few primary colours. Usually, those are CMYK, but sometimes there are more. eg. It's very hard to make a good green from C and Y, so a printer might have 5 or even 6 primary colours (the new photoprinters that come with digital cameras are often like this). Look on the flap of your nearest cereal box for a calibration pattern and see how many primary colours they use. Process colours are used whenever there is a wide range of colours needed - such as an illo or artwork.


    Spot colours: specific, exact colours are chosen. This is how business cards and stationery are made and almost always how corporate logos are printed. You don't blend colours to make the blue you want, you pick Blue #47B. Spot colours are exactly the same every time.

    Sorry, maybe that's TMI.
     
  15. Sep 10, 2006 #14
    shmoe, does this mean that if you're working in CMYK that the screen shows you how it will come out of the printer?

    I don't seem to have the option of working in CMYK with my photoediting software and there is always a discrepancy between the screen image and what I print.

    In any event, it isn't at all clear to me why anyone ever thought it was a good idea to manufacture CMYK printer cartridges if everyone's screen displays in RGB.
     
  16. Sep 10, 2006 #15

    Pythagorean

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    photoshop is the way to go. I think you can even chose your dpi on there.
     
  17. Sep 10, 2006 #16

    shmoe

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    It will never quite match exactly, but you don't have to worry about having RGB colours that a CMYK printer can't approximate well causing potentially unexpected hideous results.

    Does your photoediting software come with some kind of monitor calibration setup to try to match your printer?

    I think the end product is better quality. It might use less ink overall as well, but I don't know for certain why it's used. I don't really work with any of this, I'm just usually standing in the line of fire when my girlfriend is in need of some computer assistance.


    It can change dpi. Photoshop is expensive though.
     
  18. Sep 11, 2006 #17
    I wish I had a way to try it. Color is a big issue for me when I print out photographs of my colored pencil drawings. So far they have always been noticably altered from the original images.
    Not that I'm aware of, but I've also never looked for such a feature. I use Corel Paint Shop Pro X which was reccomended as being almost as powerful as Photoshop but considerably cheaper and easier. I haven't remotely begun to exhaust all the things it seems to be able to do, so I'm pretty happy with it.
     
  19. Sep 11, 2006 #18

    DaveC426913

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    OK, the question is more rightly:

    " why anyone ever thought it was a good idea to manufacture RGB screens if all the printers in the world are CMYK."

    Since printers were around many decades before cathode ray tubes.

    Anyway, if "light-based screens" and "pigment-based papers" could use the same colour spaces, you can bet they'd make them that way. (And if you invent one you'll be an instant billionaire).
     
  20. Sep 11, 2006 #19
    I don't really understand this because I seem to be able to go to my photoediting program and make patches of perfectly authentic looking cyan, magenta, and yellow on a screen that supposedly can only display in red, green and blue.

    How can my screen display yellow at all if the closest thing to yellow at it's disposal is green, a mixture of yellow and blue?
     
  21. Sep 11, 2006 #20

    shmoe

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    Yellow on screen is made from red+green light. It's not the same as blending paint on paper, this is a good looking explanation:

    http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a3_344.html


    There are colours your rgb monitor can display but you can't print with cmyk. Photoshop has a 'gamut warning' that will show you which colours fall out of the range of whatever profile you've set up. An example:

    http://www.myjanee.com/tuts/safecolors/safecolors.htm

    The greyed out part of the picture of the flowers will not be printed properly.
     
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