1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Can space-time rip?

  1. Apr 4, 2016 #1
    If so, what causes it to rip? Does it "heal"? What would a rip look like to us? What is the tension threshold at which spacetime rips? What are the units of this "tension"?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 4, 2016 #2

    Nugatory

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

  4. Apr 4, 2016 #3

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I'm not so sure. I suppose it depends what you mean by ripped. If ripped = infinitely depressed, then I think the answer to this would be yes, as that's a black hole, a "depression" in space time that when light travels along a path through that singularity, it never comes out, presumably because it never reaches the "bottom" of the "depression". At least that's been my interpretation. With this in mind, a singularity would be indistinguishable from a rip. However, I don't think you can talk about "holes" in space-time, as that's pretty meaningless. (There's a region of ??? where space-time doesn't exist, so either a region of space, where time doesn't exist, or a region of time where space doesn't exist, or a region of something where neither exists. Doesn't seem to make much sense.)
     
  5. Apr 4, 2016 #4

    Ibix

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    I think that the singularity at the centre of a black hole is general relativity's way of telling you that it can't describe what's going on there. We need a theory of quantum gravity to describe it properly. So I would be a bit cautious about interpreting it literally as a hole in spacetime.
     
  6. Apr 4, 2016 #5

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Not literally, but indistinguishable. If you can differentiate the two. This singularity behaves as a hole would behave, in that light just sort of "disappears", as one would expect to happen with a rip.
    Perhaps you are correct about the QG, but I think a proper description of the singularity (yet to come about) would suffice just as well. IMHO.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Can space-time rip?
Loading...