Can specific gravity vehicles reach NEO with balloons?

  • Thread starter MR. P
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NEO (Near Earth Objects), it is not possible to use balloons or SGV's (specific gravity vehicles). Although balloons can reach high altitudes, they do not provide enough propulsion to attain the necessary velocity for orbit. NEO usually refers to orbits of asteroids or comets that come close to Earth, usually beyond Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The vehicles that traverse this high altitude domain are called nearcraft, which include sub-orbital rockets and high-altitude balloons. Balloons can reach up to 51.82km, while the record for altitude reached by a crewed balloon is 34.668km. Therefore, balloons are not a feasible option for reaching NEO.
  • #1
MR. P
Do you believe or is it possible to reach NEO with balloons or SGV's (specific gravity vehicles)?
 
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  • #2
Well, achieving orbit requires two components:
- altitude
- speed
Balloons may conceivably get you the former, but you're still gonig to need some sort of propulsion to attain the 7mi/s velocity to stay there. And I think, betweent the two, that's the lion's share of the effort.
 
  • #3
What is a 'Specific Gravity Vehicle'?

Like Dave said,

You can get very close to space with balloons and aircraft. You can't get to orbit with them. Still, they are much less expensive than a rocket launch for things which just need to be 'up' and not in a microgravity environment.
 
  • #4
MR. P, could you elaborate on what you mean by NEO?

I generally think in terms of LEO (Low Earth Orbit) or GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit).

From Dave Darling's site
Dave Darling said:
Definitions vary. According to some, LEO includes orbits having apogees (high points) and perigees (low points) between about 100 km and 1,500 km. Others extend that range up to 2,000 or 3,000 km. In some cases, the distinction between LEO and MEO (medium Earth orbit) is dropped and LEO is considered to be any orbit below geosynchronous altitude. The majority of all satellites, as well as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, operate from LEO.

NEO usually refers to orbits of Near Earth Objects (NEOs), i.e. asteroids or comets, which have a close approach with earth, but those are usually beyond GEO altitude (~ 22,241 statute miles, 35,786 km).

Balloons or very light aircraft are not going to do much to get to LEO.

The realm of Near Space officially lies between 75,000 feet (~23km) and and 62.5 miles (100km) according to the International Aeronautical Federation (FAI). Here we consider a wider range that extends up to 200km or so where it becomes safe for satellites to remain in orbit without immediately becoming dragged down by friction with the residual atmosphere.

The vehicles that traverse this high altitude domain are called nearcraft. These include sub-orbital rockets, which make quick jumps into and out of near space, and high-altitude balloons that can loiter there for extended periods.


Weather balloons routinely go to 27km (~90k ft). Scientific balloons go to 42 km (137k ft or 26mi) and remain at high altitudes for several days. The world record altitude reached by an unmanned balloon is 51.82km (170k ft or 32.2mi).

The record for altitude reached by a crewed balloon was set by Malcom D. Ross and Victor A. Prather who flew to 34.668km (113,740ft or 21.54mi) on April 5, 1961.
from http://www.hobbyspace.com/NearSpace/ .

Perhaps you are referring to Near Space?
 
  • #5
Elevating the ignorant

I want to thank all of you for your contributions. The primary reason for me joining this forum was to subject my blatant ignorance to your patient guidenance and nurturing and you have done an excellent job of keeping the giggling to yourselves. Many people like myself interpret their environment differently ie 'sgv's' or from my perspective specific gravity vehicles...
Through these forums and with the character and knowledge level of the respondents this site is an invaluable resource for the equivalent of peer review and education. I

I am a grandfather looking for places that my grandchildren can 'hang out' without parents or grandparents worrying about what and where their treasures are spending their time. I will without reserve recommend the 'Physics forum' to anyone interested in higher education and the pursuit of intelligent communication...

Thank you again for setting the higher standard...

frank MR. P
 

Related to Can specific gravity vehicles reach NEO with balloons?

1. What is Near Earth Orbit (NEO)?

Near Earth Orbit (NEO) is a region of space that is relatively close to Earth, typically within 2,000 kilometers. It is important for scientific research, satellite communication, and space exploration.

2. Why is NEO access important?

NEO access is important for a variety of reasons. It allows for the launch of satellites, which are essential for communication, navigation, weather forecasting, and other applications. It also enables space exploration and scientific research, such as studying asteroids and other potential hazards to Earth.

3. How do we access NEO?

NEO can be accessed through various methods, including rockets, space shuttles, and other spacecraft. These vehicles use powerful engines and advanced technology to travel through Earth's atmosphere and reach NEO.

4. What are the challenges of accessing NEO?

Accessing NEO can be challenging due to the high speeds and extreme conditions involved. Spacecraft must withstand high temperatures, radiation, and intense forces during launch and while in orbit. Additionally, precise calculations and timing are necessary to reach NEO and maintain a stable orbit.

5. How does NEO access benefit society?

NEO access benefits society in numerous ways. Satellites in NEO provide essential services such as GPS navigation, weather forecasting, and communication. Studying NEO also helps us understand the origins of our solar system and identify potential hazards to Earth, allowing us to develop strategies to mitigate these risks. Furthermore, the technology and knowledge gained from accessing NEO can lead to advancements in space exploration and other fields.

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