Can Tungsten, Iridium, Osmium, Chromium, Vanadium, & Pure Silver mix after melting?

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Summary
The 6 metals in equal amounts. Through the melting method in a foundry. Not the powder method. Or will this end up not mixing and having cracks due to not adhering to the Hume-Rothery rules? And if not an alloy then what will happen once all 6 are put in a foundry and melted together? Or if in 6 separate foundries and then poured all in together in a 7th foundry?
Purpose is to make a ring.
 

Vanadium 50

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What is the melting point of osmium?
What is the boiling point of silver?
How is this supposed to work?
 
Maybe put each in separate foundries, each foundry heated up to either the metal's melting point or just all at whichever metal has the highest, and then once all metals are melted, pour all 6 together in an empty 7th foundry
 
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Vanadium 50

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You didn't answer my question about melting and boiling points.

At what temperature do you think this is going to happen?
 
Tungsten is the highest of the six, so we'll go with that temperature (Tungsten's melting point). It's going to be higher than Osmium and Silver anyway. I just realized that Osmium, Chromium, and Vanadium may be toxic so I'm replacing it with Titanium, Molybdenum, and Tantalum instead.

I think having electricity run through the Tungsten in a foundry (since it's the one that's going to be the most difficult to melt) until it melt, and then pour in the other 5 melted metals in, might make it work. Because otherwise the silver would boil off before Tungsten even melts if all are put in one foundry. I haven't figured out the exact way to do it but the question is more of, will these 6 metals actually mix and adhere to the Hume-Rothery rules?
 
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Vanadium 50

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I don't see how you can be well above the boiling point of one metal and create an alloy that way.
 

jrmichler

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Can you melt and mix the two metals with the highest melting points and create an alloy with a lower melting point than either metal, then melt and add the metal with the third highest melting point, and repeat down to the metal with the lowest melting point?

I don't know, so I'm asking. I do know that tin-lead solder melts at a lower temperature than either lead or tin, and was wondering if this was a general phenomenon. Also if it works for more than two elements.
 
I don't see how you can be well above the boiling point of one metal and create an alloy that way.
Wait, you're right, Titanium and Silver would boil off. I'll have to look for an alternative metal
 
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Okay so now the line up is:

Tungsten-Iridium-Tantalum-Molybdenum-Rhodium-Niobium

Would melting together equal parts of Tungsten, Iridium, Tantalum, Molybdenum, Rhodium, Niobium create a substitutional solid solution or become intermetallic?

I think intermetallic means, in this case, they won't fully mix so you'll see layers and streaks of some of the metals not actually mixed together with the rest. The solid solution would be them mixed like an actual alloy or something.
 
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berkeman

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Okay so now the line up is:

Tungsten-Iridium-Tantalum-Molybdenum-Rhodium-Niobium
Did you mention your end application for this yet? (If so, apologies that I missed it) Or is it some sort of art project?
 
A ring for a wealthy acquaintance
 

Astronuc

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Would melting together equal parts of Tungsten, Iridium, Tantalum, Molybdenum, Rhodium, Niobium create a substitutional solid solution or become intermetallic?
Senary alloys are certainly complex, and the solubilities of the various elements vary in the others. One may wish to contact a company that specializes in refractory and noble metal alloys, e.g., Johnson-Matthey, H. Cross, Plansee, H. C. Starck, . . . . One can search for various refractory alloys and which offer different combinations.

Is one looking for equal amounts in terms of atomic fraction or mass fraction?

Usually, in binary systems, one will find a base metal, e.g., Ir, and minor element, e.g., Rh, e.g., Ir-10Rh. One can find examples of Ir-Rh (50/50), Ta-W (1 - 10% W), and Mo-Nb. Probably would want to do three binary alloys in powder form, mix then sinter.
 
Equal amounts in proportion by mass (%), so 16.6% each, ideally.

Would you recommend an arc vacuum melting method for this? Just to get the metals mixed together and hopefully with no insolubility
 

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