Can Ultrasound Destroy Damaged Chromosome 17 in Cancer Cells?

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In summary, the p53 gene, which is often damaged or missing in cancer cases, is located on chromosome 17, one of the smaller chromosomes. This can make it easier for the gene to be damaged or removed during cell division, resulting in altered gene expression. However, in some cases, a chromosome can break off and attach to another chromosome, causing trisomy or translocation, which can result in cell death. Ultrasound is not an effective method for destroying damaged chromosome 17 in cancer cells, as it is not specific enough and does not have enough energy to break covalent bonds in biomolecules.
  • #1
sontag
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The p53 gene which is damaged or missing in many cases of cancer
is located on chromosome 17 which is one of the smaller chromosomes?
Does the size of chromosome 17 make it easier/more difficult
for p53 to be damaged/removed?
Do chromosomes respond to ultrasound?
Could a damaged chromosome 17 be destroyed in cancer cells by ultrasound?
 
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  • #2
the size of the chromosome does play a role, since during cell division a translocation can occur, where a piece of a chromosome breaks off and winds up stuck on another chromosome. this can result in altered expression of a gene, or overexpression.

downs syndrome, for example, is caused by have 3 copies of chromosome 21. but sometimes a piece of chromosome 21 will break off and stick to chromosome 14 (a translocation) thus giving trisomy in effect, even though there are technically the correct number of chromosomes.

trisomy or translocation of most chromosomes results in cell death. 21 is also a smaller chromosome, in fact i believe it is the smallest. so as radical of a change such as chromosomal defect is, it could possibly allow survival of the organism by virtual of the fact that the chromosome is small.

keep in mind, that none of this may apply to a cancer cell...it depends on how that cell became cancerous. what we call "cancer" is molecularly a collection of at least several hundred different diseases. many forms of cancer do not rely on p53 at all.

ultrasound is not something that will work, a covalent bond of a biomolecule is not going to be broken by something like ultrasound, unless it was a massive amount of energy in which case the cell, and neighboring cells, will long be dead by that time.

also, to date, something like ultrasound is not specific enough. cytotoxic drugs, as terrible as they are, are more specific than ultrasound would ever be. acoustic waves simply propogate through the air too widely, targeted radiation is usually of much higher wavelength in order to try to "narrow the beam" and yet deliver enough energy for cytotoxicity.
 
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  • #3


The size of a chromosome does not necessarily determine the likelihood of a specific gene, such as p53, being damaged or removed. While it is true that chromosome 17 is one of the smaller chromosomes in humans, this does not necessarily make it more susceptible to damage or loss of the p53 gene. The location of a gene on a chromosome may play a role in its stability, but other factors such as environmental exposures, mutations, and cellular processes also contribute to gene damage.

Chromosomes do not respond to ultrasound as they are not living entities that can sense external stimuli. Ultrasound waves are used in imaging techniques to visualize the structure of chromosomes, but they do not directly interact with or affect the chromosomes themselves.

It is also unlikely that a damaged chromosome 17 in cancer cells could be destroyed by ultrasound. Cancer cells are highly complex and adaptive, and a single gene or chromosome is unlikely to be the sole cause of their survival or destruction. Additionally, ultrasound is not a targeted treatment for cancer and is not typically used to specifically target or destroy individual chromosomes.
 

Related to Can Ultrasound Destroy Damaged Chromosome 17 in Cancer Cells?

1. What are chromosomes and their sizes in humans?

Chromosomes are thread-like structures found in the nucleus of cells that contain DNA. In humans, there are 23 pairs of chromosomes, with sizes ranging from 50 million to 250 million base pairs.

2. How are chromosome sizes determined in humans?

Chromosome sizes are determined using various techniques such as karyotyping, which involves staining and arranging chromosomes based on size and shape, and DNA sequencing, which determines the number of base pairs in a chromosome.

3. Do chromosome sizes vary among individuals?

Yes, chromosome sizes can vary among individuals due to genetic mutations or structural variations. However, the overall number and size of chromosomes remain the same in a healthy individual.

4. What is the significance of chromosome size in humans?

The size of a chromosome does not necessarily correspond to its importance. However, larger chromosomes may contain more genes and play a crucial role in determining an individual's traits and characteristics.

5. Can chromosome size affect health and development in humans?

Changes in chromosome size, such as deletions or duplications, can lead to genetic disorders and developmental abnormalities in humans. However, the exact impact depends on the specific genes affected and the severity of the change.

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