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Can you eat Ikizukuri cuisine?

  1. May 14, 2013 #1
    Makes me really sick.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
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  3. May 14, 2013 #2

    Evo

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    OMG, I've seen this before, they make sushi from living animals. Horrible.

    Beware, you may not want to watch.
     
  4. May 14, 2013 #3
    I've seen it with lobster and it's disturbing. I don't get it.
     
  5. May 14, 2013 #4

    wukunlin

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    it's still blinking... wtf...
     
  6. May 15, 2013 #5

    cobalt124

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    I could never eat this. I'm hoping its illegal in the U.K. Wikipedia only names Australia and Germany as countries who have outlawed this.
     
  7. May 15, 2013 #6
    That's just sick. The frog was still moving, yet she was still eating his insides.
     
  8. May 15, 2013 #7

    trollcast

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    Why did I have to watch that just before lunch :yuck:
     
  9. May 15, 2013 #8

    D H

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    How is the way we treat lobsters somehow more humane? We boil live lobsters, crabs, and crawfish. They are best when they are alive up to the moment they are dropped into that pot of boiling water.

    Even closer to home, we eat live shellfish. Oysters on the half shell -- yumm. Marinated scallops -- double yumm. Those oysters are alive (or should be alive) right up to the moment they are chomped. Those scallops are (or should be) alive right up to the moment they are sliced and dropped in the marinade.
     
  10. May 15, 2013 #9
    But they are still dead when I'm eating them. With the video I saw, the chef cuts the lobsters back open and people started digging in while the lobster was still moving around.
     
  11. May 15, 2013 #10
    We, humans, are as empathetic as how much our mirror neurons tell us.

    http://www.parentingscience.com/empathy-and-the-brain.html
    http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/do_mirror_neurons_give_empathy

    A human resembling live eye on a plate gives us bigger secondary pain.
    A half dead moving animal on a plate gives us secondary pain than a dead animal.
    Killing an animal which has more features as our own species give us more secondary pain. (more empathetic on a mammal dying than a non-vertebrate(scallop, oysters))
    It hurts you more when a cuter and bigger animal suffering (bird, dog, cat, rabbit) than a not-so-cute smaller animal (fly, mosquitto).
    People who are against killing an animal for food has less issue with killing a mosquito.
    It hurts immensely to watch a human die that to see a picture of a human dying. It hurts more to see a human dying than to read a news about some death.

    So, to answer to why we are less empathetic to some creatures, it is just the way we are evolved.
    We just seem to be more connected to some of the species.

    If we kill another animal for our own evolutionary benefit, the action seems justified for the masses.

    A half dead live looking animal on a plate might give a freshest food feeling for some minds, but there is no evolutionary advantage to it. Plus, we get confused what happened to their secondary pain.
     
  12. May 15, 2013 #11

    Monique

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    Grosssssss, what's wrong with first knocking an animal unconscious before tearing it apart?
     
  13. May 15, 2013 #12
    Yes. It's not that bad, just chew thoroughly.
     
  14. May 15, 2013 #13

    turbo

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    I can't plead innocence, since I love shucking oysters and eating them, but at least they are not looking at me like the frog...
     
  15. May 16, 2013 #14

    Evo

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    Hopefully they don't feel pain, but the frog definitely can.

    http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/questions/question/2279/

    There was a recent study on crabs that showed they sense pain and remember. The crab's food was placed in 2 holes. One hole would give the crab an electric shock when it tried to go in to get it's food. No crab entered the hole with the electric shock more than twice, they would only get food from the shock free hole.

    This whole thing about eating food while it's alive is based on superstition, that somehow the "life force" from the living animal is transferred to the eater. It needs to be stopped.
     
  16. May 16, 2013 #15

    ZombieFeynman

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    I would not eat such food.

    I find it distasteful in more ways than one.
     
  17. May 16, 2013 #16

    Monique

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    Yes, that's true. I watched a documentary where people in India would go to a convention to swallow a fish alive, because they thought it would heal their asthma.

    For the Japanese however, I rather think the practice is done out of the need to have fresh fish that isn't spoiled. An animal on the plate that is still moving is an unmistakable sign that the meat is fresh.

    On a side note, meat has to die/decay first before it's nice on the palate right? The live meat must be very tough to eat.
     
  18. May 16, 2013 #17
    In agreement with jobyts, the problem here is logically flawed. Your disgust lies with the frog's appearance being remotely anthropomorphic (specifically, it's eyes), thus making it's prolonged demise seem identifiable on a human level, even empathetic.

    If frogs looked like giant featureless blobs of jelly, we wouldn't have this problem. Whether it were alive or not, and whether it felt pain or not, would become irrelevant to this unique cuisine experience.

    Throw your petitions away.
     
  19. May 16, 2013 #18
    They should get its head off the dish, customer won't eat the head with skin on alive anyway. It is there to disgust me, seemingly so.
     
  20. May 16, 2013 #19

    D H

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    In our culture, yes. In their culture, no. To the Japanese (and many other Asian cultures), it's a sign of ultimate freshness. Just because we see it as gross doesn't mean they do.
     
  21. May 16, 2013 #20
    In the first place, I don't think flies or mosquitoes feel pain. And I don't know about other people, but I tend not to focus so much on whether or not the animal in pain is cute, but how much pain it's in and whether it's necessary or not. Find me the ugliest animal in existence that can feel pain and I guarantee you that I'm going to be against torturing it. Humanely killing it before cooking it - okay, I can deal with that. But there's absolutely no need to cut something up while it's conscious, rip its organs out and then leave it to die in excruciating pain.
     
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